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From Newbie to Core Contributor w/ ExtraHash

Here, you can see the knuckles lifting gently off the ground as a user becomes a dev

It’s been a while since we’ve interviewed a member of the team and as we just added a new Core Contributor last week it just felt right to pick back up on the article series. Enjoy!

RS: ExtraHash, thanks for taking this interview! You’ve been in the TRTL community for a few years now, and over this time we’ve watched you grow from a normal user to the developer of our default GUI wallet, and now a core dev, in fact! At the end of this interview, I hope the readers get to know you and your projects as well as the rest of us have, and maybe if we’re lucky it will bring people a little bit closer to one of the people that makes the tools they use daily.

So to take it from the top, how did you find TRTL? Do you remember what brought you here initially?

EH: I found TRTL very early on, within the first month of launch, through a thread someone had posted (where else) on /biz/. It was my first foray into getting involved into a fledgling coin, and let’s just say I didn’t really know what I was getting into. In fact, at the time, I had very little background knowledge of blockchain in general. It was a great experience, and before long I was up to speed on alot of basic blockhain concepts due to the helpful and educational nature of the community.

RS: How long would you say you were a regular user before you got the idea you wanted to be a dev? What was it that made that change?

EH: I didn’t decide to take steps toward becoming a developer until I had already been in the community as a regular user for a bit over a year, sometime in February 2019. I’d say there were two major events that spurred my transformation:

The first event was a video that you actually posted in #general, a movie on open source software and Linux called Revolution OS. It really struck a chord with me. Watching that video made me realize what open source actually was: it’s more than just opening your source code for others to inspect, it’s a revolution and community movement based around allowing others to use and modify software and change it as they see fit. This understanding was eye opening for me, and gave me a bit of a different perspective on TurtleCoin and our community.

The second event was the event that actually spurred me to start writing code. Madk had a bot in the market server that was able to give statistics on the network and market: price, hashrate, and so on. He made some changes to the bot that I did not like. So, instead of asking madk to revert the changes, I set out to write my own bot to take its place. That bot became my first ever coding project, and is still running in the market server to this day.

RS: That’s cool, and I’m not sure many people knew that about you. What brought you from doing a chat bot to wanting to design the now default GUI wallet for TRTL?

EH: The chatbot was written in JavaScript, which I had some (but not much) experience with before, mostly simple scripts on web pages and things like that. I set out to learn as much about JavaScript as I could, thinking it would be best for me to at least become competent with one language before attempting to learn others. There were a few other projects in between which I used to further hone my JS skills, but soon I began to want to contribute back to the TurtleCoin community in a meaningful way.

At this point, I was also following TurtleCoin’s development very closely, and one thing really piqued my interest: walletbackend-js. Zpalm had written a really nicely done native JavaScript wallet backend implementation, but no-one was yet developing a new wallet with it. Also, the current GUI wallet was fairly clunky and seemed to be abandoned by the developer. I saw a good opportunity to actually start a project that could improve the end user’s experience with using the network, and from that came Proton, my baby and GUI wallet which i’ve crafted for the community.

RS: What does walletbackend-js do for you, or I guess, for Proton?

EH: Walletbackend-js provides a way to interface with a wallet and the network in native JavaScript, which allows you to do things like write a wallet application or turtle-powered web application. It can run in a lot of places, including directly in a browser. With the old electron-based GUI wallet, there was always some “lag” to the user experience because it was just a graphical front-end wrapping the turtle-service executable. Proton, however, is a 100% native JS application, with no messy child processes.

RS: Is there a vision behind what you’re trying to create? Has becoming the default GUI wallet changed how you feel about the trajectory of Proton?

EH: Well, to be honest, the intention was always to become the default GUI wallet. Eventually I’d like to add multi-coin support for some of the other bigger coins, I think it’d be neat to have a fully open source client-side multi-coin wallet. However, for now, I’m just focused on improving Proton and making it the best possible experience for users on the TurtleCoin network. If anyone would like to see specific features implemented, please feel free to make an issue on the GitHub page with the feature request.

Shows you node fee info too, which is handy

RS: What are some features you’re working on currently that we will be seeing soon that maybe some aspiring developers reading this can help with? Do you have any Good First Issues?

EH: I’m currently working on a search function to search any information locally in the wallet. It’ll match contacts in the new address-book that will be releasing next version, as well as hashes stored within the wallet such as tx hashes and payment IDs.

The issue list is looking rather slim at the moment, but I am having one issue with a module called react-select I’m using on the send page for the address input: you can’t access the context menu to paste via mouse click because the real input width seems to automatically resize based on input size. This would probably be a good one to try and tackle.

RS: For anybody who’s reading this who may want to help, can you touch briefly on the different parts of the tech stack that Proton makes use of? It uses nodejs, what else?

EH: Sure. At its root, yes, it’s a nodejs application. It’s also making use of electron, a framework for developing with web-based technologies on the desktop, and react, a front-end framework for web applications. It’s also making use of redux, react router, and webpack on the web-application side. We’re using bulma for the CSS. Of course as we’ve already mentioned, the TurtleCoin network interaction is powered by wallet-backend-js. I’m also using several tools to make up the development environment like eslint and prettier for code linting and formatting, and react-hot-loader for hot refresh in dev mode.

RS: With a list of technologies like that you’re bound to snag someone’s attention! Extra, thanks for this interview. Is there something we didn’t cover that you want to share with everyone?

EH: Thanks for having me! I’d just like to say thanks again to the TurtleCoin community and especially the developers that have helped me along my path to becoming a dev; particularly zpalm, ibmcd, mary, rock, fexra, and anybody else that’s helped me out along the way. Because of you all I’ve discovered something new that I’m really passionate about and I see myself doing for the rest of my life. I also look forward to getting more actively involved in core development and leaving my own mark on the core TurtleCoin codebase.

Check out ExtraHash’s handywork in the latest release of Proton GUI Wallet at https://getproton.org

If you’re a beginner developer or want to learn more and help out, check here for some good first issues to get started with https://github.com/turtlecoin/turtle-wallet-proton/issues

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This Week In TurtleCoin (July 16, 2019)

This has nothing to do with TRTL but we needed a catchy header image and the beers are saying this is the one.

This week depending who we asked, you either got cooked alive in your apartment or floated away in the rain, nevertheless we still got work done 😀 here is this week’s update!

Developer Updates

This is a place where anybody in our community can submit a post about the TRTL project they’re working on. It’s a great way to attract helpers for your project and show people what to keep an eye out for. We encourage you to show works in progress as well as finished products, as we’re happy to see them all and it shows that we’re an active community. To submit your post, click this link

Proton v0.0.9-beta Release!

What’s up TurtleCoin? Thanks very much for everybody that helped out beta testing the new wallet. If you’re not currently testing it out, now is a great time as we just dropped version 0.0.12, the first non-beta release! Since the last post, we’ve added alot of improvements and features, as well as mac support for a truly cross-platform desktop wallet. You can grab the latest version at the Releases link below.

ExtraHash

https://github.com/turtlecoin/turtle-wallet-proton/releases/

Turtle Arcade

Games.Turtacus.com has been updated to TurtleArcade.Games . So don’t forget to change your bookmarks if you want to keep up-to-date on all the fun games and projects made by our awesome community!
I’m currently working on a free CC0 assets section to help you all get some nice visuals in your project! If you want to help contribute some art give me a ping in the #dev_gaming channel on Discord! Thanks for your support!

Oiboo

Https://TurtleArcade.Games

Chukwa’s Labyrinth

Chukwa’s Labyrinth

Hey! So I’ve been working on my first game for the past few weeks. I think I mentioned it last week in the roundup. It’s finally ready to play! In the game, you have to go through a series of mazes in order to reach the treasure at the end. So far there are only two levels, but there are instructions and plenty of stuff in them! Play it and let me know how it is, ping me in #dev_gaming with any comments or advice! You can download it from the link given below

Sajo8

https://github.com/Sajo8/chukwas-labyrinth/releases/tag/v0.1-alpha

Good First Issues

Good First Issues are tickets that are marked as ‘easy wins’ for new developers. If you want to be a TurtleCoin Developer, these are great tasks to start with!

Daemon+WalletBackend timestamp adjustments
The current /getwalletsyncdata rounds a timestamp to midnight. Depending on what time of the day you start a fresh wallet, you may have no blocks to grab (we need to roll back a bit more than we currently do with the timestamp adjustment), or too many (since it’s rounding to midnight which is quite far away).
https://github.com/turtlecoin/turtlecoin/issues/704

Remove no longer relevant asserts
Since pretty much everyone runs the daemon in release mode, instead of debug mode, we’ve ended up where we have a number of asserts which constantly trigger, due to altered/moved/rewritten sections of code.
https://github.com/turtlecoin/turtlecoin/issues/811

QueryBlocksDetailed does not populate transaction extra “raw” property in response
.transactions[i].extra.raw is not populated in the code as it should be.
https://github.com/turtlecoin/turtlecoin/issues/815

Rig of the Week

Samsunger, by Fabien (Lyon, FR)

This week we are featuring a rig called “Samsunger

Details: 2 samsung S7 / 1 samsung S8 / fans and smart usb charger

What are your secret tips and tricks about mining TRTL?
when turtles are pregnant

Introduce yourself : Fabien, 32 years old from france, Lyon

Hashrate: 4 kh/s

Pay With TRTL

In the Discord we have a channel called #Merchandise where people can post things you can buy with TRTL. To view items for sale, check the pinned posts in that channel. These are a few of the items from this week.

mikeykones’s dad hats

mikeykones’s dad hats

TURTLECOIN DAD HATS 🧢 199k TRTL free shipping anywhere in the US, 299k TRTL shipped anywhere else in the world!

Red, black, grey and cream are available currently

Contact @MikeyKones in discord for details!

Free Advertising

  • Play Crash/Dice/Blackjack/Roulette with TurtleCoin! coco
  • My site of turtle stuffs, I have more to ad but havent 🙂 At anyrate, has the gpu/cpu ranks and more! http://turtle.japakar.com
  • Browser mining for TRTL http://turtle.japakar.com/miner/
  • Hi 🙂 I’m working on a new game for TurtleCoin. It’s a web based card game where you can collect the emojis from the discord and then fight other players using them. The game will launch in the next 10 days, if you want to stay informed about updates join my discord server. Hope to see you there 🙂 https://discord.gg/USK4Zvb
A TRTL sticker in the wild 🙂

Shoutouts & Thanks

This is the place to mention someone in the community who has done something nice or deserves recognition.

Mrlahaye “@Judderz, Thanks for sending those sweet TurtleCoin decals once again. I just bought that new car and applied my spare sticker on it. It looks very nice when i’m in the wild. https://imgur.com/a/Q6kob8N”
greywolf welcome back (again, again) Sauvn
greywolf thanks to Muf for the reminder to be a good turtle, and apologies to IBMCD for forgetting about that
greywolf i cast 1 vote to assign the role of Contributor to teacup, for all of the great TurtleCoin artwork she has provided to the community over a long period
Elkim Thanks to @iburnmycd for being constantly arrogant and mean and for droving away another member of our community. Keep doing what are you doing.
Elkim Thanks fipsi | The Machine#0789 for working on the merchandise bot 🙂 The Fiat Whisperer is coming!
Diceovice Floyd gets new fish https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=qdLRMduj4Mc
japakar.com Thanks to the community for the continued work and progress!
Zpalm Shoutout to davelong from plenteum for finding a bug in the miner and suggesting a fix!
Rock shouts out to sajo, fipsi and extra for putting in the extra mile this week on their projects, it’s great watching you guys grow!

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This Week In TurtleCoin (June 17, 2019)

From the Teacup Files https://blog.turtlecoin.lol/archives/the-teacup-files/

Developer Updates

In this issue we all post shocked pikachu emojis when people forget to upgrade their software for the fork

To update your core: latest.turtlecoin.lol

The countdown until upgrade: https://explorer.turtlecoin.lol/

The Teacup Files

Teacup has returned with a bountiful harvest of memes! Check them out here https://blog.turtlecoin.lol/archives/the-teacup-files/

Rotate Discord Server Invite Backgrounds

Discord’s new Nitro Boost stuff allows for Discord owners to choose custom background images when people use the invite links. However it means people have to manually click buttons in the Discord app.

So please head over to https://support.discordapp.com/hc/en-us/community/posts/360047859252-Add-API-endpoint-for-server-invite-background and upvote this post to encourage the Discord developers to expose this feature in the Official API. SoreGums

https://support.discordapp.com/hc/en-us/community/posts/360047859252-Add-API-endpoint-for-server-invite-background

TurtleCoin Github Bot

I’ve been looking into supporting multiple people making an issue at once with the Github bot; it doesn’t seem like it’ll be too hard to add, and it’ll be a nice little perk. If you don’t know what the Github bot is, I recommend you check it out! It lets you easily create a Github issue on any turtlecoin repo w/out an acc; type !tag issue in the #bots channel to learn more

Sajo8

turtlecoin-crypto

As mentioned last week, I’ve been working on combining the different versions of this repo together. Good news! It’s done.

This repo now builds the following:

1) A c++ static library (Windows, Linux, OSX)
2) A shared library via DLL (Windows) that can be linked against in any number of languages (C# anyone? — @canti, I see you)
3) Node.js native addon module (same as the NPM package before)
4) Native Javascript implementation (slow, very slow, but it works)
5) WASM module for browser use (much, much, much faster than the Native JS in browser)

All of the builds support the core crypto used not only in wallet functions (creating keys, finding our outputs, generating ring signatures, etc) but they also contain all of the hash functions available in core, including Chukwa (Argon2id with our parameters). The WASM module makes it very easy to bring the crypto methods used in TurtleCoin to the browser which will make client-side web wallets faster than ever*. In addition, if someone wanted to build a web miner based on the package they can do so.

Spoiler alert: Someone is building a client-side web wallet built on this using wallet-backend-js.

iburnmycd

https://github.com/turtlecoin/turtlecoin-crypto

turtlecoin-utils

Using the updates to the turtlecoin-crypto library, I’ve performed a few updates on the development branch of turtlecoin-utils. Most notably, the utils package now smart loads the crypto module. If we can load the Node native addon module, that’s always our first choice. If we’re in browser, then we try to load the WASM first. Lastly, if all else fails, we fall back to the native Javascript implementation. This also has the added benefit of cleaning up a bit of the code that revolves around the crypto in the library.

In addition, due to the exposure of all of the crypto functions in the library now, we’re able to check that the ring signatures that are generated via the library are checked to be valid upon creation thereby reducing the chance of generating an invalid transaction via the library.

If that wasn’t enough, I’ve added a webpack configuration to the project that ties everything up into a nice bundle for inclusion for browser use. Browser use did you say? You betcha. This webpack has been deployed as part of the TurtleCoin Explorer and is used for the tools page (playing with wallet addresses & keys) and the transaction checker. It’s going to make that top secret client-side web wallet shine.”

iburnmycd

https://github.com/turtlecoin/turtlecoin-utils

CS-TurtleCoin

Over the last week, I have done a lot on the CS-TurtleCoin/CantiLib project. I pushed some major updates, including a full rewrite of the main repo, which features improvements across the board. As I have been fairly silent with the project lately, I’m going to give a quick run-down of what it is and what I have gotten done thus far.

CantiLib is a multi-purpose C# library with many useful tools for a blockchain environment, including a standalone P2P client system, a configurable REST API server, logging utilities, database functionality, cryptography, byte-level serialization, and CryptoNote protocol handling. CS-TurtleCoin is an effort to tie these tools together to create a fully operational TurtleCoin node, coded from the ground up in a C#.

As of the time of writing this, I have P2P connectivity, API handling, CryptoNote deserialization, peer discovery and handshaking, some database functionality, the start of a blockchain cache, and a number of other utilities and functions in place. Lately, my focus has been on refining peer discovery between nodes, porting cryptographic functions from the core code to C#, connecting TurtleCoin-Crypto to the library, adding more functionality and ease of use to the API server, and have also begun work on the sync process and blockchain caching. More to come soon!

canti

https://www.github.com/turtlecoin/cs-turtlecoin

wallet-api-go

wallet-api-go

This project aims to provide a wrapper for making wallet-api requests with Go. All of the wallet-api responses are marshaled into an appropriate type. You no longer have to manually convert from map[string]interface{}!

If there’s any bugs in the codebase, feel free to leave an issue on GitHub. 😀

dsanon

https://github.com/anonanonymous/wallet-api-go https://godoc.org/github.com/anonanonymous/wallet-api-go

TurtleCoin Chukwa Cuvée Testnet available

As everything is in full swing to get ready for the Argon2id-based new TurtleCoin algo called chukwa, we needed to spin up a local testnet.

This allows us to benchmark, test and optimize our different boards, and see how the trtlrig works compared to the native TurtleCoin miner.

We made our test environment available. If you want to see how your harware will do on the new algo, and try out how it feels living on the cutting-edge technology, build your trtlrig from the add_chuwka branch available in the TurtleCoin github, and point your xmrig miner using the following parameters:

-o publicnode.ydns.eu:3420
-a chukwa
-u your TRTL address

Please note no web front-end available, and no TurtleTestCoin pay-outs. This environment is for benchmark tests only.

@OléCuvée

34 hot singles in your area are waiting to upgrade your wallet format

Wallet format upgrading

A few people have requested that there be a utility to upgrade a wallet from the WalletGreen format (zedwallet, turtle-service), to the WalletBackend format (zedwallet-beta, wallet-api).

I’ve been working on this for the past few days, and think I am close to completion. Got a few bugs with transfer amounts being incorrect, but hopefully it won’t be a sticking point.

I’m considering adding an automatic upgrade, so you can transparently open an old format wallet and have it upgraded without any user interaction. One downside is that we have to generate the key image for each input when we upgrade the format, which is pretty slow for a large wallet – this can take around 10-20 seconds on my ~8000 transaction wallet.

Of course, this will only have to be done once, so the delay could be worth it.
Hopefully this will make it easier for services to migrate to wallet-api, along with new GUI’s/CLI’s using the new backend.

Zpalm

Rig Of The Week

Each week we like to highlight a person who has sent in pics and descriptions of their TRTL mining rigs. This week is ZenMaster Mr Lahaye’s turn! Ironically, it was his idea to start this column about rig of the week so maybe he had this planned all along! hmmm!

RigRX560 by ZenMaster (MrLahaye)

6 x Msi Aero rx560 4GB with fan upgraded to Artic Accelero Mono plus
1 x CPU Intel G3900 2.8Ghz
1 x 8 gig DDR4 stick of memory
1 x Msi z270-a pro Motherboard
1 x Corsair 850 Watts powersupply
1 x SSD Sandisk 16 GB with HiveOS
1 x Veddha 6 Gpu mining rig Frame as pictured no fans

  • Around 20 Kh/s
  • This rig consumes around 350 Watts taken at wall.
  • I got this complete rig for 600$ CAN on Ebay. Check Ebay auctions often and snipe last minute deals. I can usually get one or two deals like this every month.

I’ve already described myself in a previous roundup : https://blog.turtlecoin.lol/archives/this-week-in-turtlecoin-may-7-2019/

Advertisements

  • CuvéeTurtle Pool located in the heart of Europe (Prague), with fast connectivity and scalable hardware platform (ARM-based SBC Cluster) is looking for you – miners like you of all shapes and sizes! Help us with our journey to grow our pool. You would still be one of our early adopters. Low payout limits. Our long-term commitment and friendly support by @Olé Cuvée himself. Pool web frontend webpage: https://publicnode.ydns.eu Join us now! Point your miner to publicnode.ydns.eu:5555 ./xmrig -a cryptonight-turtle -o 192.168.99.254:3333 -u TRTLxxxxxxxxx --donate-level 1 -p rig2 Flood us with some serious hash rate 🙂 No matter how much you throw at us, we will cope with it! https://publicnode.ydns.eu
  • @shelly has finally started creating drawings and paintings for sale versus doing doodles for all of us Turtles. A few of her pieces are available at Buckland Arts. Can you spot which ones are hers? Check out the page and give it a like to support creative Turtles. https://www.facebook.com/bucklandarts/
  • Browser miner, use it or embed it into your sites and let others use it! Hashes about 200-400 on mid setting. http://turtle.japakar.com/miner

Buy With TRTL

These are things that were pinned this week in the #merchandise section of TRTL Network Discord chat.turtlecoin.lol

selling asus dual gtx 1060 for 1.25M TRTL shipped (OBO) – Extrahash on discord
ASUS X370 CROSSHAIR VI EXTREME (full package) – 2M TRTL shipping within EU on quote – Elkim on discord
I have brand new, still sealed GPU risers for sale in TRTL. 25k trtl each, 5 for 100k. opened this one to take a pic. Bulk quantities are available. Small amounts can be shipped for around 80k trtl in a flat rate padded envelope within the US. – extrahash on Discord
I have two clusters of RPis. 3 B+. Four in each cluster. 120 watt charging power supply. 2 each 5 port switching hubs. SD cards pre-programmed with Ubuntu and XMrig miner. All set to mine. Just connect to a router or range extender. Edit the config.json file with your wallet address. Good to go! If anybody wants this as a whole, make me an offer. I do not want to part this out. Comes with all 1 ft and 18″ CAT 5e cables. Anyone interested? – radarlarry

Good First Issues

Trying to get your developer role in Discord? Want to be part of the dev team? Here are some ‘Good First Issues’ so you guys can have some low hanging fruit to get you started! Beginners, enjoy!

Shoutouts

grey’s pi3b cluster of doooom
  • iburnmycd Shoutout to @shelly for a successful grand opening of Buckland Arts where some of her artwork is featured.
  • JAPAKAR KING OF THE OZARK Once again, shoutout to a great community! This place is unique and awesome!
  • greywolf thanks much to DatsunPatrol for the Optimizing-RPi-TurtleCoin-Mining guide, and to Olé Cuvée (aka LeoCuvée) for the encouragement and oversight, as i put together a 4-raspi3b+ mini-tower mining TurtleCoin
  • rock shout to zpalm for helping with my golang homework, thanks to dsanon for the wallet-api-go work, thanks to japakar, greywold, mufalito and others for tips this week, and thanks to the community for again being awesome, and thanks to teacup for the memes 😀
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This Week In TurtleCoin (May 7, 2019)

This is a place where anybody in our community can submit a post about the TRTL project they’re working on. It’s a great way to attract helpers for your project and show people what to keep an eye out for. We encourage you to show works in progress as well as finished products, as we’re happy to see them all and it shows that we’re an active community.

To submit your story, click this link https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdTs4nDSKai2fPpCnuT0WXzutCuJQk7nFlFqYCgmBlz4DEM7Q/viewform

Developer Updates

Cuvée bits and bobs updates

First things first, cannot believe it was end of March we posted our last update. Reading through the TRTL updates from previous weeks, a lot has happened – and this is true also on the CuvéeTRTL front.

1. Our TurtleCoin pool that runs on ARM SBC hardware passed a stress test successfully. We consider that pool now a mature, stable and reliable. Why? We asked our fellow community members to burn the pool down with tons of a hash-rate*. We had volunteers who together aimed at us their miners of a total hash power of 1.9MH/s** for a total time of 15 hours. And… nothing happened. No drama. No crash. I remember how TP2 commented on this that evening: “The only thing you failed to achive with this test is to crash the pool! :-)”

*actually I said “I will pay 10k TRTL to everyone who participates on smashing the pool up to 1MH/s hash rate. All participants bounties paid out!
**special thanks to @E***m

2. Same boring stuff on the ARM SBC based pool. At the time of writing this roundup, the pool mined 112 blocks, orphan rate 5.66%, all that in two months between 6th March – 6 May 2019. Well done you lovely little beast! This is the future of decentralized, distributed computing!

3. We started http://cuveebits.com which I see as a personal project focused on Singleboard. Distributed. Open. Computing. Best Things In Life Are Blended. There is a lot of relevant TurtleCoin stuff, such as how to run a miner or a node on ARM SBC hardware, which one does best in our view and soon(TM) we will publish lesson’s learned from running TurtleCoin mining pool on ARM SBC. We hope some of the cuveebits.com posts will make it to the main TurtleCoin blog, as we discussed recently with Rocksteady!

@LeoCuvée

There are 6 turtles hidden in this image.

shellnet

Long time no update :(. I finally pushed the captcha, ratelimiter, and transaction history code to github. If you’ve forked shellnet, make sure to pull the latest updates. Also, shellnet now supports url parameters that will automatically fill out the transaction form. ie. https://shellnet.pw/account?address=ADDRESS&amount=100&paymentid=PAYMENTID
I’m also in the process of cleaning up and replacing most of the codebase. I’ll probably integrate some of the new Go features. Stay tuned 😀

dsanon

https://github.com/turtlecoin/shellnet-webwallet-go

Turtacus

Turtacus disappeared for a while because he ran out of funds and people stopped using him. Due to requests, I have reactivated him, however, his prizes fund will not be topped up unless the community decide to top it up. Turtacus prizes are set to a percentage of his total tipjar, so if the community fills his tip jar, the community will benefit from prizes.
Unfortunately, I have had little to no spare time lately and this is why Turtacus was put to sleep. I will pop my head in as often as I can to make sure everything is going ok but please remember you can DM me if you need help

Rynem

checkpoints broke, everybody abandon ship

Checkpoints, what checkpoints?

For those of you who sync your own daemons, you might know about a thing we use called ‘checkpoints’. You may have also noticed that the checkpoints repo hasn’t seen an update in almost a week.

To put it simply, Github isn’t a CDN.

What does that mean? We’ve been generating a file every day for a long time now, and every day it gets larger and larger. We started getting complaints as we approached 100mb, and now we’re over 100mb and show’s over. Github isn’t meant for large file storage and distribution, so we’re looking at new options to get this file delivered to you. Likely we’ll just split up the checkpoints file and continue as usual, but a few of us are checking out other options like IPFS as a potential backup option.

OK, I’ll admit, it’s pretty much just me who sees anything in that idea, but who knows, maybe we get IPLD going and offer an option for IPFS block storage. I’m not promising anything, or even that we’ll go further than “looking in to it”, so if you’d like to discuss your ideas or help implementing this one, hop on over to dev_general.

EDIT: sike, I got checkpoints on IPFS working. Download checkpoints from IPFS and delivered by Cloudflare: http://ns1.turtlecoin.lol/ipfs

Rock

This video was a bit inspiring and pushed me a bit further into my “looking in to it”

Running a public node for fun and profit?

This update was inspired by our conversation together one night with @Elkim about some of the public services. We spotted a trend. Similar to what happened with pool services, in order to attract more miners (respectively more Wallet users to public node services), the community as a whole has the tendency to compete how little TRTLs charged for a brilliant service.

The screenshot introducing this update – demonstrates how the public services are slowly converging to zero. Yet we’ve noticed a few fellow community members in the Discord channels saying they had trouble to sustainably keep their services running, many opting out from it after a while.

Yet I hear many of you probably saying, well, but I do not need to charge more TRTL for my public service, I am doing it for the community. And you might be perfectly right. You personally may not need to charge more. But if you do, you’re more likely to give away in bounties, tips to other members, support or recognition for other folks creating a fun or useful service.

This is why both me and @Elkim raised transaction fees on our public nodes to the other side of the spectrum. To balance things out. We believe in value’s ability to create value.

I used the title for this update based on Rocksteady’s article “Running a Public TRTL Node For Fun and Profit”. We admire you and the community loves you for the fun element and dedication. Keep in mind though … if not the profit, then the sustainablity factor, at least! We don’t want to see you go away frustrated from undercutting the value of the service you provide.

@LeoCuvée

Divine

Hello everyone, development has been coming along well with Divine, my new wallet utilizing turtlecoin-wallet-backend-js. It’s currently pretty stable and does all of the things you’d expect a wallet to do, here’s the current feature list:

  • Create new wallet files
  • Open saved wallet files
  • Import wallets from mnemonic seeds
  • View current balance
  • View current sync status
  • Send a transaction
  • Export private keys

If you’d like to try it out, you can install it with npm by using the following two commands: (you’ll need wget, nodejs, and npm installed)

wget https://github.com/turtlecoin/turtlecoin-wallet-nodejs/releases/download/v0.2.4/divinewallet-0.2.4.tgz

npm i -g divinewallet-0.2.4.tgz

Then run the wallet from anywhere with

divine

I’d really like if people could try it out and let me know what they think. If anyone has features they’d like to see implemented, please raise an issue at the GitHub repository:

https://github.com/turtlecoin/turtlecoin-wallet-nodejs/issues

Additionally, if anyone would like to help, I’ve raised several issues in the repo that indicate the direction I want to head in improving the wallet further. Thanks alot to @zoidbergZA for the PR to migrate to typescript.

Thanks Turtle Community and peace out!

ExtraHash

https://github.com/turtlecoin/turtlecoin-wallet-nodejs
When you can hear your bot stirring and making noise, but can’t recognize a word of it.

.trtl TLD ChatOps bot

To streamline things with checking and approving domain proposals, we’ve begun creating a bot that will help separate the wheat from the chaff when someone wants to register a domain.

Currently the bot can answer a few commands and validate whether you’ve supplied it with part of the correct syntax. It works a bit like this:
.trtl register A rock.user.trtl 19.69.42.0

The bot would respond with a turtle emoji to signal that the correct syntax has been used for the A/CNAME/TXT classifier and the IP address (maybe, we’ll see if spaft can pull it off haha) and once we get the rules for domain names plugged in it should be ready to be hooked up to some actual automation like triggering the repo and approving/denying applications.

Skynet is upon us. Press F to pay respects.

Rock

Rig(s) Of The Week!

Last week, I derp’d and posted the same RotW as the week before, so this week let’s do two of them!

VegasMiner by ZenMaster (MrLahaye)

This is the computer I use for gaming and work.

It’s powered by :
– 1000W GOLD PSU from OCZ.
– Asus X370-F Motherboard
– AMD Ryzen 1700x (Cooled by a Corsair H100)
– GeIL SUPER LUCE RGB 16GB RAM (2 x 8GB / PC4 24000)
– XFX AMD Radeon RX Vega 64 8GB (Unmodifed bios)
– MSI AMD Radeon RX Vega 56 8GB (Unmodifed bios)

What are your secret tips and tricks about mining TRTL?

For this kind of setup my suggestion is:
Use either a dual boot partition to have an OS dedicated to gaming and one for mining or a bootable USB Key.

My name is ZenMaster (MrLahaye),

I’m a hobbyist cryptoccurency miner that started mining Dogecoin about 5 years ago with a single GPU AMD Radeon 7950.
Afterwards, I’ve bought some SHA256 USB ASIC Block Eruptor and a powered USB hub to experiment with the equipment, software, etc.
I took a break from mining until 2017 and started buying some used equipment on ebay until today.
I now have 2 Gaming computers, 2 Rigs and a third one coming in soon. Will be posting all of them in the coming weeks.

Average : -Ryzen 1700X : 10800 h/s -Vegas 64 : 16 000 h/s -Vegas 56 : 16 000h/s

“Fake Vega Rig” by Zerouan

Community Advertising

CuvéeARM TurtleCoin Public Node for sending your large amount transactions. Low power consumption. Powerful. Reliable. Just of you. 1900 TRTL fee per transaction. http://publicnode.ydns.eu:11898

Shoutouts & Thanks

greywolf – thanks to all the developers working their asses off in the #dev channels, really behind the scenes to the average user. it’s fun to watch them collaborate on different things in our open atmosphere. well, at least it looks fun to a non-developer. of course, i gotta duck now and then when things start getting thrown around a bit, but it always settles down and is worth the reading.

Rock – [this space for rent.]


greywolf – thanks to Sierra for always bringing joy and sunshine with her.

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SoreGums on Distributed Compute [Karai]

Image result for beowulf cluster

I think I need to listen the to the Kevin Rose TRTL podcast again – the only reason I really ended up in TurtleCoin in the first place is that of the core concept of a “network” with “applications” and “TRTL is just the currency one”. There was a bunch of other details that I liked as well technically, hence probably warrants a relisten.

Cause if we want “other” applications it seems like it mostly comes down to messaging. As in information needs to get around to the apps on everyone’s devices. Right now we have the daemon which then feeds wallets. The wallets keep balances by reading the messages in the blockchain. Blockchain works cause of PoW. Nice.

How do we get other applications then?

The current thinking is a smart contract platform, aka Karai, something like Ethereum – however, we’ve identified issues with it that we don’t want to adopt. So breaking down things to first principles any app we can think of is doable the traditional way (racks and go – racks is the catch-all phrase for anything that combines compute/storage), depending on what it is that can be expensive to maintain or difficult to launch in the amount of time needed to set up various parts.  Racks are also susceptible to adversaries be they Governments or script kiddies. Thus the natural jump is to a peer-2-peer model, aka de-centralisation. Once Filecoin becomes a real thing storage via IPFS is handled, what isn’t handled is the compute side of things. Ethereum does it by being the compute, the daemon has a virtual machine that accepts scripts which when invoked produces results that are then committed to the blockchain and chicken dinners for all! As we can see they are having scaling issues and personally I don’t believe that is the best way to go about this in the first place. The thing is whatever is in the blockchain is never actually used as is, apps written to run client-side are also needed to interact with any of this data.

Idea

How about we simply augment the TurtleCoin blockchain to support the various kinds of messages needed to power these client-side devices? Maybe it needs Karai to help with that, not sure. Thinking about this it is difficult to define Karai as a smart contract platform like Ethereum as the only way you get Ethereum is if you do Ethereum and all that isn’t what I believe is actually needed to get to “TurtleCoin Network” powers distributed applications.

Examples

Gods Unchained

Having non-fungible-tokens is something that should exist. This trading card game is a practical example of how being able to say I own a thing and it is a unique thing, like printing out a piece of paper and it being unique, is useful. Keep in mind that representing physical items in the digital realm is different, yes someone could chop up a block of land into 1,000 pieces and say that whoever has those 1,000 digital tokens owns the land, but really the person whose name is on the land title at the local land titles registry is the landowner… Then the game actually takes place off-chain and requires a client. The rules are published and the smart contracts are in place and the tokens exist – with all of these components in place ANYONE can create a client to play this game or any other kind of application where those tokens fit. No one can actually take the tokens away from anyone cause blockchain. The tokens don’t rely on the game devs being around in the future, the tokens now exist, their value and significance is open source and committed to digital permanence as long as Ethereum exists, even then if Ethereum dies they can still be sucked up into a new thing as all of Ethereum up to the stop point exits…

Cipherise

This is a platform to handle identity verification without usernames/passwords by using PKI. In practice it works like this, the bank calls you and says “so give me all your personal details and I can verify I’m speaking with the correct person” and you’re like “dafuq? you’re not my bank, scammer!” and hang up.

Instead, the bank calls you and sends a signal on their side of the app conversation with some info they told you on the phone, you open your app and confirm you are you and the bank also sees the confirmation, you know you are talking to the bank and the bank knows they are talking to their customer, no more “so ahh give me all your details so I can steal your identity”.  It works by sending messages and apps responding to those messages as needed. This is like our currency application. The difference here is 95% of the messages don’t need to be recorded as they are only useful for the moment they are read. Committing all these messages to a blockchain is really only useful for auditing purposes in the future to see what happened previously. Really dedicated apps can take care of that if needed. These messages are small however if the application was adopted by millions the message volume would explode the storage requirements of the network (~25KB/msg, 10k msg, 91GB/yr for ONE app…) and make it unsustainable. Thus it seems like some kind of ephemeral messaging ability is needed. See discussion in #dev_general for more on ephemeral messages.

Conclusion

These are my thoughts on what TurtleCoin network needs to help us address, non-fungible-tokens / ephemeral messages. Maybe Karai is our non-fungible-token platform and ephemeral messages go into TurtleCoind. Outright compute in a distributed VM, I don’t know about that maybe? an example would be great!

Your Thoughts?

join me and others in the #dev_karai chat on Discord: http://chat.turtlecoin.lol. Jumping off point for when this conversation might have started, link

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How a transaction is born, and how wallet syncing works

Well, when a coinbase transaction and a fusion transaction love each other very much…

Just kidding. Grab a drink, this is a long, and confusing read.

Lets start by looking at where the money for a transaction comes from in the first place. All money originates in the network from mining – which creates new coins, via a coinbase transaction.

A coinbase transaction is a special kind of transaction that is rewarded to the person who mines a block. The money ‘magically’ appears, and is not sent to the miner by anyone.

Each block has a well defined reward it can claim
Each block has a well defined reward it can claim

This might make you think that miners can print as much money as they want. However, the coinbase transaction cannot be more than the current ‘reward’ – if it is, the other pools and daemons will reject the block containing it. The current reward is calculated by looking at the emission curve, and the total amount of coins in the network.

Lets say Bob decides to do some solo mining, and gets lucky one day. Maybe he mined block 900,000.

Bob's lucky day
Bob’s lucky day

Bob got 29,013.99 TRTL from mining this block. As you can see, this transaction has no inputs, because it is a coinbase transaction. The bit we’re interested in here are the outputs. Interestingly, Bob does not just receive a big chunk of 29,013.99 TRTL. Instead, he receives 6 outputs, of varying amounts, which add up to the full 29,013.99 TRTL.

Whenever a transaction is sent, it must be split into denominations. This is quite simple to do – it’s just splitting into units, such as thousands, hundreds, tens, etc.

The reason for this is due to how the mixin / privacy features work. When we form a transaction, we need to match the amounts we use with other ones other people have sent. If we didn’t split our outputs into these standardized amounts, we would need other people to have made transactions of exactly 29,013.99 TRTL before, which is pretty unlikely. Think of these standard amounts as building blocks to make any transaction amount.

So, Bob has got an amount of TRTL now, comprised of a few separate outputs. How does he spend them?

Finding which transaction outputs belong to us

First, Bob needs to work out if this transaction belongs to him. Since CryptoNote coins are private, we can’t tell what address a transaction was sent to without owning the private keys belonging to that address.

Now we’re going to have to get a bit nerdy and talk through some code. I’ll try and keep it simple. If you want to follow the code, check it out here.

Each transaction has a transaction public key which comes with it. We start by taking this public key, and our private view key, and performing some magic crypto operations, we can generate a key derivation.

Hey bro, you dropped your transaction
Hey bro, you dropped your transaction

Next, we loop through each output in the transaction, so in this case we’d start with the 0.09 TRTL output.

For each output in the transaction, we take our key derivation, the output index (This is simply the ordering of the outputs in the transaction), and the output key (That’s the long hex string which looks like a hash in the image)

We do some more magic crypto operations, and we get out a public spend key. This is the public spend key that the transaction was sent to.

If you weren’t aware, a TurtleCoin address (and any CryptoNote address, actually) is just a ‘nicer’ representation of the public spend key and the public view key.

For example, the address:

TRTLuyXrvesGMqGTQvHhUUjcvhmL6w82fVtavT2tyELWfPrCwzGTaxb6FVEeLCeyJK4DXiYGWWii8NFZK11bZR36XkjzDpWRwPd

corresponds to the public spend key:

506b84105bd39634e48b9009fece08847a8b9efcacb7e92f56f545cfe58ad7c5

and the public view key:

ee3144dc1f62e72e19ac21e4133a35061995ac0d7f0d241e4672b9f9b7ddf9f8

So, we’ve got out the public spend key this transaction was sent to. What’s next? We just need to checkout if that public spend key is the same as the public spend key our wallet uses.

If it is the same as the public spend key our wallet uses, this transaction output belongs to us!

By the way – if the transaction doesn’t belong to us, we won’t get out the actual spend key the transaction was sent to – we’ll just get some meaningless garbage. So, your privacy is intact 😉

We then repeat this process for every output in the transaction. We can’t automatically assume because one output belongs to us, they all do. Remember, you can send a transaction to more than one person at once.

Once we’ve added up the outputs that belong to us, we’ve worked out how much we’ve been sent in this transaction. In Bob’s case, that’s 29,013.99 TRTL. Good work, Bob!

Storing the magic stuff which lets us send transactions

Bob’s got his wallet all synced. He wants to buy a TurtleCoin t-shirt from Alice. How does he send his money?

Cool shirt, Bob
Cool shirt, Bob

If we find that a transaction output belongs to us, we can then create a transaction input from that, using our private spend key. We can then spend those inputs, creating new outputs, for someone else to repeat the cycle with. A little bit confusing.

There are a few bits of information we need to store that comprise our new input. We need:

  • The transaction public key – This is included in the transaction.
  • The output index – This is the output index previously mentioned.
  • The amount – We can take this from the output data.
  • The key – This is the output key we used before.

We also need the global output index. This is part of the output data. This is used to keep track of all the output keys. Each different amount has a different global output index store. So, the first ‘1’ amount that was ever used in a transaction gets a global output index of 0. The second ‘1’ amount gets an index of 1, and so on. If someone then sends a ‘2’ amount, this gets an index of 0, since the indexes for different amounts are not related.

That’s a bit confusing, but if you don’t understand it, don’t worry – It doesn’t really matter.

Finally, we need to generate this inputs key image. To do this, we need to take the key derivation from before (remember that?), and our private spend key. We then perform yet again some magic crypto operations, and we are left with the key image.

Because we need to generate a key image to spend our funds, and we need a private spend key to do so, this allows us to create ‘view only’ wallets, which can only find incoming transactions, and cannot spend them, since it has no private spend key.

If you’re feeling utterly baffled by the previous explanation, the following diagram might help. Or, it might confuse you more. Sorry!

Arrows, so many arrows
Arrows, so many arrows

Spending our transaction inputs

Bob has got his transaction inputs all ready in his wallet. Surely he’s able to make a transaction by now?? Good news Bob. Let me explain the steps he needs to take.

Selecting the inputs

Link to the code here.

To start with, we need to find enough inputs to cover the amount Bob wants to send. Alice is sending her t-shirts for 25,000 TRTL, so we need at least that much. He also needs at least 0.1 TRTL for the network fee.

Inputs are selected randomly, to make it harder to detect any patterns in spending. We just keep taking inputs whilst we don’t have enough funds to cover the transaction.

Lets say that the inputs that get randomly selected are 3 TRTL, 0.09 TRTL, 20,000 TRTL, and 9000 TRTL. That sums up to 29003.09 TRTL, so we’ve got enough to cover the transaction.

Since Bob only wants to send Alice 25,000 TRTL, but he doesn’t have the exact amount to send, he instead sends the ‘change’ back to himself. In this case he wants to send 25000 TRTL + 0.1 TRTL (for the network fee) and he’s got 29003.09 TRTL in the inputs, so he needs to send 4002.99 TRTL back to himself.

Bob's spare change
Bob’s spare change

Preparing the destinations

Link to the code here.

Now we need to split this 29,003.09 into separate atomic amounts, and indicate who we’re actually sending each bit to.

Alice has given Bob her address, which we extract the public spend and view key from. We then split the 25,000 TRTL we’re sending her up into units, which is simply 20,000 TRTL + 5000 TRTL. These will eventually become two outputs for Alice to scan, just like we did at the beginning of this article.

Next, we need to setup the destinations that Bob is sending to himself. We take our address, split it into a public spend and view key, and again split up the amount into units. This will give us 4,000 TRTL + 2 TRTL + 0.9 TRTL + 0.09 TRTL.

So, the transaction will have 6 outputs – 2 belonging to Alice, and 4 belonging to Bob.

Outputs = 20000 TRTL + 5000 TRTL + 4000 TRTL + 2 TRTL + 0.9 TRTL + 0.09 TRTL

Preparing the Transaction Inputs

Link to the code here.

Next we need to hide our real inputs among other inputs, to obscure which inputs are really used to create the transaction. We ask the daemon for as many fake outputs as our mixin value, and we need this many for each amount we are sending. If we are using a mixin of 3, we need 3 fake outputs for 20,000 TRTL, 3 for 9,000 TRTL, and so on.

Next, we loop through each real input, and the fake outputs. We generate a key image using the real input transaction public key, our private view key, and our private spend key. This also gives us a temporary key pair for each transaction input, which we’ll need later for our ring signatures.

Now we can finally make a transaction input, which consists of the amount, the key image we just generated, and the global output indexes of both the fake outputs and our real input. Gah, confusing.

We end up with 6 transaction inputs, with each one having 3 fake global output indexes, and one real global output index. No-one but us can tell which is the real index.

Yay, pretty gifs
Yay, pretty gifs

Preparing the Outputs

Link to the code here.

Now we can make the outputs of the transaction. We start by generating a random key pair. This is used so multiple transactions to the same address cannot be linked together.

Next, we loop through the destinations we prepared earlier. We generate the output key by taking the receivers public view key, the private key from the random key pair we just generated, and the receivers public spend key.

Then, we create our output, which is just comprised of the output key we just generated, and the amount the output is worth.

We store the public key from the random key pair we generated – this becomes the transaction public key later.

Assembling the transaction

Link to the code here.

Putting the pieces together
Putting the pieces together

We’ve done most of the work now, we can start putting this transaction together. We start by creating the tx_extra – This has a few bits of data in, but most importantly is the transaction public key. If we’re using a payment ID, we also add that in here.

Then, we copy over the inputs and outputs we prepared earlier, and add a few extra bits like the transaction version, and the unlock time if you want your transaction to not be spendable instantly.

Finally, we hash this data to give us the transaction prefix hash.

Generating the Ring Signatures

Link to the code here.

Finally, we generate the transaction ring signatures. These are used to verify that we own all the funds being spent. We generate signatures for each transaction input, using the private key of the temporary key pair we created for each input earlier, the transaction prefix hash, the public key that each fake transaction output has (including our real input), and each transaction input key image. This again, uses some cryptography magic.

Ring signatures indicate that one person of a group signed a message with their private key, but it cannot be determined which person signed the message. This proves we are able to spend the amounts in the transaction, but our identity is kept hidden.

Sending the transaction

Finally, we’re done! We send our transaction off to a daemon, and if it verifies the transaction is legitimate, Alice will get her funds shortly. There’s one thing we missed when I explained this – detecting when you have spent funds, rather than just when you have received funds.

Bob's transaction flies across the network
Bob’s transaction flies across the network

Finding which transaction inputs belong to us

Fortunately, this bit is pretty simple. Remember when we generated a key image, when we found a transaction that belonged to us? Because that key image is used in a transaction when we send it, we simply look at each transaction input, and if it uses a key image which we created, then we sent it.

Thus, when Bob scans the transaction he sent to Alice, he will see the 4 inputs we used to create the transaction, and find that they use key images he previously created. He will mark these key images as spent, so he doesn’t accidentaly use them in another transaction. This would cause an attempted double spend, which would fail, as a key image can only ever be used once.

When Bob sums the transaction inputs, he would get 3 TRTL, 0.09 TRTL, 20,000 TRTL, and 9000 TRTL – The exact amount he sent. He should then scan the transaction outputs, and find 4 outputs that belong to him – 4000 TRTL + 2 TRTL + 0.9 TRTL + 0.09 TRTL – The change that he sent back to himself.

With this, Bob can work out the total amount he spent on the transaction – inputs – outputs = 25000.1 TRTL.

You may remember that Bob decided to pay a network fee of 0.1 TRTL, but we never gave an address to send this to. The network fee is simply the difference between the sum of the inputs, and the sum of the outputs – the miner who includes this transaction in a block is allowed to add this amount to the coinbase transaction as a reward.

Summary

In summary, a transaction is comprised of inputs, outputs, and ring signatures.

  • Transaction inputs are money we have previously received, combined with some data to generate the keys. They are also hidden among other people’s inputs.
  • Transaction outputs are money that the receiver(s) get. This may include some change which returns to the sender.
  • Ring signatures prove the transaction is valid and we own the corresponding private keys. This is an example of a zero knowledge proof: A third party can prove the signatures are legitimate, but it gives them no information about who the sender is, or who the receiver is, just that the transaction is legitimate.
  • If a transaction input has the same key image as one we generated, that is an outgoing transaction by us.
  • If a transaction output has the same public spend key as ours when decrypted, that is an incoming transaction for us.

I’m sorry if you didn’t understand this. It’s quite confusing, and quite hard to explain. I have to say, the whole inputs, outputs, fake outputs + real input thing confuses me as well.

Thanks for reading.
Thanks for reading.

Thanks for reading – hopefully you learnt something!

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We are now listed on CoinMarketCap!


There was cheering, there were tears of joy, we have finally made it!

https://coinmarketcap.com/currencies/turtlecoin/

We know the info on there is not all filled in yet, and we’re working on getting it fixed, so in the mean time please send CMC a thank you tweet, or thank you FB post to express your gratitude that they finally listed us, because truthfully we really did not meet the requirements yet to be listed. This just shows how powerful the community can be!

https://coinmarketcap.com/currencies/turtlecoin/

You all earned this one fair and square, and we have you guys to thank! Keep up the good work, and thank you for requesting TRTL at your favorite sites and services, it really motivates us to work harder!

We made it 😀
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This Week In TurtleCoin (July 22, 2018)

This week we reached #27 on CoinGecko Developer Score, polished our golang skills, and compiled almost completely on Raspberry Pi!

Pictured: A sample of TurtleCoin legacy daemon code

Announcements

A new fork upgrade has been released! In this release we moved the entire network up a notch on the security score and set a static mixin of 7. If you don’t know what that means, we have an article about it right here!

If you use a local daemon, please upgrade your software to the latest version of TurtleCoin. If you run a service like a pool or faucet and haven’t upgraded yet, you’ll notice walletd is now called service. New users are easily fooled by the word “wallet” so until walletd is on it’s own in releases, we’ll be calling it “service”.

Developer Updates

These are updates from our open developer community. We like to hear about your project whether you’re done or not, so be sure to leave an update about your Turtle project for next week!

left to right: Canti, Rashed, Zpalm, Iburnmycd

C# Daemon —Hihi~~ Canti has started some great work on the C# port of the daemon lately. I didn’t want to leave it all to him so I’ve been helping out a bit — so far I’ve ported the public/private key cryptography, so we can generate keys which will work as they do in the current daemon. I’ve also ported mnemonic seeds, and am now working on deriving addresses from public keys working. We would love some help, so if you are competent in C# hop over to #dev_general and maybe you can implement something too! Also — If you want to start working in another language, that would be cool too! Rashed has started work on the same stuff in golang — we’re really interested on getting daemon’s implemented in multiple languages, so if one has a bug, the whole network doesn’t crash.— Zpalm

https://github.com/ZedPea/CantiLib/tree/master/CantiLib/Blockchain/Crypto

We would love some help, so if you are competent in C# hop over to #dev_general and maybe you can implement something too! Also — If you want to start working in another language, that would be cool too!

TurtleCoin OneClickMiner

TurtleCoin OneClickMiner —Heyoo everyturtle! 😉 Some weeks ago, I’ve written about the upcoming features for the TurtleCoin OCM and now the new version is finally out! Along with a ton of fixes, this new release comes with automatic saving of selections and settings and new help texts. I declared it a beta pre-release — if you encounter bugs or notice flaws, please let me know on Discord or GitHub! Thanks ^^
 I’m looking forward to hearing from you! 
— EncryptedUnicorn#7915

https://github.com/ZedPea/CantiLib/tree/master/CantiLib/Blockchain/Crypto

Webwallet v2 (Work in progress)

Webwallet v2 (Work in progress) —I started to create a new Webwallet with PHP using the Laravel Framework. It will be more stable, easier to use and more secure than the old one. It’s not finished yet. — cryptoBOOM


Athena ATHX Update — Block emission now requires 4 transactions to be in the queue before a block is created, ensuring that we operate with as little waste as possible. To my knowledge nobody else is doing this. Currently we are emitting one block per day on average. We’ll be beginning collaboration on a proof of stake whitepaper and implementation soon, along with an update article. — Rock

https://github.com/ZedPea/CantiLib/tree/master/CantiLib/Blockchain/Crypto

Community Advertisements

Would you like to promote your Turtle pool or service that you run? Advertise it here for free!


  • Hi as owner Turtle.Land I decided that I wanna make pool, Pool named Turtle.Casa is open for all of you… SSL port, Low fee, Payout on PayID supported, Config generator. Pool is hosted on Google Cloud server,

https://github.com/ZedPea/CantiLib/tree/master/CantiLib/Blockchain/Crypto


  • Hello, I would like to invite everyone to our mining pool! http://turtleminers.club/ Turtle Miners Club is a premier mining pool. We regularly find blocks! Speaking of blocks, we just reached our 200 blocks! Come join the club as we head towards 500 blocks. NEWS! We lunched a new WEB CPU MINER. Use your web browser and CPU to miner TRTL!

https://github.com/ZedPea/CantiLib/tree/master/CantiLib/Blockchain/Crypto


  • Hey all, just chiming in to let everyone know that snail races officially begin next Sunday. I am in the process of building a racetrack and wanted to remind everyone that we have our own TurtleCoin snail racing server linked here:

https://github.com/ZedPea/CantiLib/tree/master/CantiLib/Blockchain/Crypto

Community Shoutouts

Is there a person in the community who you’d like to mention in the roundup for being awesome? Go ahead and submit a shoutout!

secret-fan#1111 — weekly reminder than kev, beary, xaz and bunny are awesome

Imperdin — Shoutout to RockStready for being the first one to pronounce Imperdin correctly!

anon — Thanks to all the dev Turtles and helpful folks for getting so many people into crypto on a deeper level. All the average joes in the discord have a much more developed understanding of how cryptocurrencies function because of your hard work. Massive accomplishment in itself


Dacus — sss

Dreday00 — Shoutout to my Turtlefam, the most intelligent and chillest community. Come and hangout, the water is nice 😉

Specter — Thanks to all the Dev’s who are working behind the scenes to make Turtlecoin something genuinely better and not just another meetoo coin.

Browns1964Champs — I would like to thank Roger for growing snails in his swimming pool.

deskpro1886 — github-github.com/DeadManWalkingTO/Windows10MiningTweaksDmW improves turtlecoin hashrate in windows worth trying out or you can try DoNotSpy10 or Easy Service Optimizer I have all these enabled to reduce background etc windows unnecessary programs .I hope when squirrel research acorn gpu accelerator does turtlecoin we get double or triple hashrate!!!

Boris — Keep on turtling!

Khem Boi — Turtle Turtle

secret-fan#1111 — Weekly reminder than kev, beary, xaz and bunny are awesome

secret-hater#2222 — shut up zpalm

funkypenguin — Sending some ❤ to Duplicity(https://geek-cookbook.funkypenguin.co.nz/recipies/duplicity/), backer-upper of critical files, which avoided loss of data after my datacenter storage platform melted last week. The NZ TRTL pool is back in action again, at https://trtl.heigh-ho.funkypenguin.co.nz/

rashedmyt — Huge shoutout to dsanon for fixing critical bugs in my go wrapper.. forgot to mention him in the last week roundup

rashedmyt — Thanks a lot to zpalmtree for helping me out with the keccak port in go

tjwmagic — Shout out to CodIsAFish for lending a helping hand!

Roger Robers — Shout out to the whole world, TurtleCoin is the shiznit!

Zpalm — Shout out to luigi1111 from Monero for his amazing website — https://xmr.llcoins.net/addresstests.html — it’s awesome for checking you’re programming things correctly when messing with private keys, mnemonics, addresses, and more.

Zpalm — Play doki doki literature club~~, it’s free on steam

Categories
All Weekly Update

This Week In TurtleCoin (July 15)

This week we became more than a meme coin, went live with a new algorithm, got a step closer to compiling on Raspberry Pi and hung out with podcast celebs 🙂

Altcoin Buzz Podcast —Thanks to pHaTe and the folks at Altcoin Buzz Podcast for having RockSteady on for an interview, it went great! Listen to the episode and give them a subscribe on iTunes and YT while you listen!

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/altcoin-buzz-podcast/id1340381994?mt=2

Turtle-Pi

Turtle-Pi — Turtlepi came one step closer to a reality this week. I would definitely call it a partial success that some users and myself have come closer to getting the TurtleCoin daemon and wallet to compile properly on the raspberry pi, but there is still more work to do. The ultimate goal would be to keep a rolling release going of the Turtlepi software that contains everything Turtle related on a weekly update. Some day in the near future, you will be able to download a light raspbian image, flash it to a sd card then boot up your pi and have a local web wallet along with all kinds of other Turtley goods pre-loaded for new users and hackers. — crappyrules

Paper Wallet

Foldable and Sealable Paperwallet — This is an Paperwallet like the ones on bitcoinpaperwallet.com but for Turtlecoin. The Seed Phrase, View Key and Spend Key are hidden inside the foldable area. Your Turtlecoin Wallet address and an (by you) generated QR-Code for your address is on the visible area on the front. It can also be sealed with anit-tamper stickers which can be ordered on ebay. Here you can see how to fold it https://i.imgur.com/iJyQlVF.png —jarlave#9941

Download Jarlave’s Paper Wallet https://cloud.jarlave.de/files/Turtlecoin%20Paperwallet%20template%20%2B%20example%20images.zip


Turtacus — Turtacus facilitates player versus player combat in the colosseum! Players can enter and challenge a player to a fight to the death, winner takes 0.01% of Turtacus’s prize wallet every fight! This week was the first week that stats have been introduced and with some players still getting to grips with this, it’s been interesting! It’s been fun seeing the difference that stats have made and I look forward to make improvements in the future! www.turtacus.com is now the go to place for checking the leaderboard and I am in the process of trying to get adsense on the page to allow a bit of income to fund his bank more! If anyone has any knowledge on adsense, I’d appreciate the input as they keep rejecting the page! — Rynem

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/altcoin-buzz-podcast/id1340381994?mt=2

turtlecoin-rpc-go

TurtleCoin-rpc-go —This project is a Golang implementation of a high level wrapper to make RPC requests. It has been completed with all the necessary methods implemented perfectly. The response of the request is similar to a curl request made. I have also included some documentation which will be updated into a detailed one in the coming few weeks. Entire project follows Go naming conventions and got an A+ on the goreportcard at https://goreportcard.com/report/github.com/turtlecoin/turtlecoin-rpc-go — Rashedyt

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/altcoin-buzz-podcast/id1340381994?mt=2
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/altcoin-buzz-podcast/id1340381994?mt=2

Morgan Freeman

Morgan Freeman —Morgan’s a tortoise and still likes turtlecoin…. do you!?

zedwallet

zedwallet —This week zedwallet got a send_all command. As you would expect, this sends all your funds! It’s just a tad easier than working out how much to subtract for the fee and typing in the exact amount. — zpalm

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/altcoin-buzz-podcast/id1340381994?mt=2

walletd

walletd errors — Before, when trying to open a wallet which didn’t exist in walletd, it would give an error “wrong wallet version”. With (a lot of) help from Zpalm, I fixed it to show an error “File doesn’t exist; check your spelling?”, and additionally takes the argument and appends a ‘.wallet’ to it. If a file exists of that name, it suggests, “maybe you meant xyz.wallet?”. Or, if not, gives the former error. Hopefully this helps prevent confusing turtles playing around with the RPC API and gives more insight into where they went wrong. Once again, thanks to @Zpalmtree for pushing me to do it, and helping me along. — sajo8

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/altcoin-buzz-podcast/id1340381994?mt=2


snail races

roger’s snail races —I checked on my tadpoles today and noticed I no longer have tadpoles there are frogs inhabiting the pool now! Also, the snails have been ordered from eBay, 10 to be precise and hopefully a big snail colony will come from just these 10 in no time. Thanks for all your support turtle team 🙂 races begin soon!! — rogerrobers

Bounties

Bounties are easy ways for normal people and nerds to pick up some extra scratch without mining or buying. Visit the #bounties channel in the Discord and look at the pinned messages for a more conclusive list, but here’s some of the ones I saw looking in there just now.. chat.turtlecoin.lol

1MM Make a plugin

200K make a video

2MM Make an app wallet

400 TRTL Add links to TurtleTurtle.org

Shoutouts From The Community

Want to recognize a person or project you like? Want to shout out your friends? Leave a shout out for free and it will be in the next roundup!

Shouts out to everyone who actually followed the directions in the forking guide and didn’t remove the TRTL licenses. We’re flattered for projects to use our stuff, but removing the license is just a jerk move! Don’t be this guy.

if(true) — Huge

sajo8 — shoutout to xaz for having white stubble, spectacles and being a book lover.

khem boi — Tunnel Snakes Rule. 🍍

secret-fan#1111 — Weekly reminder that kev and beary are awesome

secret-fan#1111 — xaz is pretty good too

secret-fan#1111 — xaz and bunny, u guys are cool too

bbanditt — Shout out to my Business partner Jay… go f#*k yourself!

bbanditt — Thank you Zpalm and Turtle? For all your help Thanks rogerroberts, for keeping it real!!

rock — holler at everyone mining ATHX right now. staking starts soon!

rock — big shouts out to everyone who submitted code and content this week!

sajo8 — shoutout to sore for his work on the contributing guide. lets sort that up and push it to production

An obese TRTL

Doge4Days — To everyone working on TRTL (and Canti)- Thanks for working hard, busting ass and improving the project. To the moon! Love, Doge4Days

semi —https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cETuHkavYR0

Bunny — You guys are the best! I love this community with all my bunny heart!

ethical2012 — To my tortoise Morgan Freeman! The amazing Turtlecoin Tortoise!!

Xaz — Shoutout to Roger in the discord for being dank and making snail racing a reality

Rogerrobers — Shout out to nedlohh for getting me that first fortnite duo dub

zpalm — Shoutout to Canti for his great work on the new daemon 🙂

ManNotHot — The rig Goes trrrrrrrlll tttttt tt booom

dsanon — made my first commits this week. woot!

Community Advertisements

Want to advertise your TRTL Pool or service or project on next week’s Roundup Article? It’s FREE! Just leave your information in this form! Click Here

cryptonote.social
  • Good news everyone! https://cryptonote.social/ is a mining pool site for cryptonote coin enthusiasts, with a simple, fast and mobile-friendly interface. Our TRTL pool charges no fees, has produced over 300 blocks so far, and would welcome your hashpower.
  • Hello, I would like to invite everyone to our mining pool! http://turtleminers.club/ Turtle Miners Club is a premier mining pool. We regularly find blocks! Speaking of blocks, we are about to reach 100 blocks found! Only 14 to go. Don’t wait! NEWS! We just lunched a new WEB CPU MINER. Use your web browser and CPU to miner TRTL!.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/altcoin-buzz-podcast/id1340381994?mt=2

  • Come join our pool! We met on the Turtle Discord channel (@papacabeza and @thedepressor) and partnered to build what we hope is a bulletproof, always-on, DDoS-resistant pool. Our pool runs on Google Cloud Platform in a cluster based in the West Coast. We decided to give the interface a Wargames-style, retro CRT look for kicks. We’re planning to be around for a while.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/altcoin-buzz-podcast/id1340381994?mt=2


turtle.atpool.party
  • Hi guys, i would like to invite everyone to our mining party at https://turtle.atpool.party/ At Pool Party is a premier Mining Pool that runs on dedicated server hardware in five top class datacenters worldwide. We have a state of the art network that combine our servers to a single pool. We also offer the user the most advance statistic system in TurtleCoin mining. Welcome and enjoy your stay
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  • Rogerrobers here. Do you like turtlecoin? Do you like snails? Do you wanna watch snails racing live on youtube?? Subscribe to my youtube.com/seanrulez11yo and join our snail race server!!

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/altcoin-buzz-podcast/id1340381994?mt=2

  • Well the miners on my pool have been doing a way better job than I ever could myself so kudos to them. But if you are hard and hard for men, then you will want to mine with us.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/altcoin-buzz-podcast/id1340381994?mt=2