The Teacup Files

There’s a person named Teacup on Discord who makes these delightful TurtleCoin pics we like to use in the chat and in the roundup. A day or two ago Teacup gave us this collection of pics amassed from an illustrious tenure as resident meme artist, so I figured it’d be best to put it somewhere that gets the respect it deserves, right here on our blog! Continue Reading →

Ton Chan TurtleCoin Mobile Wallet Interview

One of the things that has been most requested of us is a mobile wallet. In the past we've always pointed mobile users to our web wallets, but a brave turtle came forward and put together a cool android wallet and we're pretty stoked about that, so here's an interview with the creator! Continue Reading →

FunkyPenguin’s Turtle Pool Secrets

A lot of you out there have questions about how pools work and what goes into running a successful one. Today we’re checking out an interview with FunkyPenguin who runs probably one of the coolest setups I’ve seen so far with all of the pools I’ve seen. Maybe I’m just a nerd, but I have a big appreciation for the way he’s doing things.

You’re gonna love this one!

RockSteady
Thanks again for agreeing to the interview. The purpose of this interview is for us to highlight smaller pools that have unique things about them. Giving exposure to smaller pools is important in diversifying the hashrate. I hope today to hear about you, your pool, your history in mining and what a user might find unique about your pool.

funkypenguin 

Cool

RockSteady

Your pool is a cool one, and I think the miners as well as developers will appreciate the unique qualities to it. You first came on my radar with some of the interesting infrastructure work you were doing behind the scenes. I’d like to get in to that soon, but first, tell us how you got involved in TurtleCoin, and what led to you running a pool.

funkypenguin 

(I’ve documented this here: https://www.funkypenguin.co.nz/opinion/what-is-turtlecoin-and-why-do-i-care/), but here’s the off-the-cuff version

I was opportunistically looking for coins to mine after the Monero Cryptonight v7 fork, so I spent some time on cryptunit.com. Every so often, I’d see “TurtleCoin”, and laugh at what a silly name it was, and how ridiculous the crypto space had become.

Somewhere (maybe Reddit) I saw the headline for the BlockZero (Kevin Rose) podcast featuring TurtleCoin, and the name triggered some brand recognition. The level of respect that Kevin had for the project, and the way “community” was highlighted, changed my initial skeptical opinion, and I jumped into the Discord

I felt that I wanted to be more than another opportunistic miner, and that a “baby” cryptocurrency was a good place to start learning. (There was no NZ mining pool)

I’d already spent 6-8 months building my Geek’s Cookbook (a collection of self-hosted apps running within Docker Swarm), and wondered whether I could build a TurtleCoin mining pool. I figured I should start with a testnet, so I started asking some questions in #dev_general, and @SoreGums pointed me in the right direction. I ended up submitting a PR for a testnet Docker instance of the TurtleCoin daemon which could be used to create a testnet in total isolation from mainnet.

Having built a testnet, I started working on the mining pool, learning about wallet/daemon/redis/pool, and how they interrelate. I wrote up the Docker Swarm design (a bit outdated now).

Turtle Pool – Funky Penguin’s Geek Cookbook

There were some interesting challenges re how the pool components talked to each other, some of which lined up very well with the “one-process-per-container” model of Docker. I sort of fell into it from there, started mining in my pool, discovered that I could advertise in #mining , posted my pool to r/TRTL a few times, and enjoyed the process of mining “together” with other geeky crypto enthusiasts

RockSteady

It’s great that you’ve documented your journey the whole way, and as a microservice nerd in my own life, I feel a personal respect for what you’ve done.

funkypenguin

(To be honest, I also want to profit from crypto, and I figured I’d leverage my systems experience to build pools to amass some coins, rather than strictly mining-and-selling-and-hodling)

RockSteady

You’ve got a cool frontend on your pool, and as I remember, you were one of the first to have the new-style interface. What are some of the unique qualities of your pool that would be interesting to a miner looking to diversify their hashrate some?

funkypenguin

I polled my miners on this question, asking “what features does a miner really care about?”. The best response was from @slashatello, who said “miners care about.. BLOCKS”. I was interested in the telegram/email notifications from https://github.com/dvandal/cryptonote-nodejs-pool, which remain my favourite feature. Here’s an example:

RockSteady

That looks cool, break it down for me- what’s going on in that pic?

funkypenguin

11:57 : The pool restarted (I’m running turtlecoind-ha, that’s another story), my rig connected

12:04 : The same again (this happens when the daemon gets stuck, it sometimes takes a few goes to restore stability)

12:07 : One of the miners finds a block. Yay! Now we wait 20 min to confirm it’s not an orphan

12:11 : Yes, daemon restarts again

12:29 : Block is not orphaned, now is the first time (based on these notifications) we see what our effort was (43%). Unlike the original turtle-pool software, lower % is better, so we “found” this block in 43% of the time we’d statistically expect to (we were lucky)

<by this time, the wallet has received the block reward. Redis calculates how much each miner is due, and payments are prepared>

12:31 : The pool sends the miners their portions of the block reward (minus my 0.0987654321% fee), everyone is happy

(the fee is a funny story actually – when I first setup the pool, I looked at the list of pools and saw someone else’s pool listed as 0.0987..%. I thought it was a clever attention-grabbing move, so I adopted it for myself. I think I read later that it was just a math bug!)

RockSteady

That’s pretty funny, actually! Thanks for giving us the play by play. That’s a pretty intricate setup. So you’ve made a pool, and you’ve written guides and Dockerfiles for us, what don’t you do?! You’re awesome! What do you have planned for the future, and what are you interested in learning right now?

funkypenguin

Thank you Well, this daemon restarting thing is a bit of a PITA, and the original platform I ran my swarm on was heavily contended at times, so I’ve just finished migrating the pool to a Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) cluster. I still have the occasional daemon issue (as evidenced above), but we seem to recover from a stalled daemon with a few quick restarts.

I overspeced the GKE cluster when I built it (I’m only using 22% of my resources for Turtle/Moneytips pools), so I’m currently playing with autoscaling the cluster, as well as using a “tainted” nodepool running (cheap) pre-emptive node instances for doing CPU-heaving stuff like syncing new coins blockchains. The fact that they’re pre-emptive means that Google could turn them off at any time, but the GKE engine would just spin me up a new one in a few min, and for the purposes of an initial blockchain sync, I don’t need to maintain any sort of availability

So I’m enjoying learning more about the world of Kubernetes / Terraform. I’m also continuing to build the Geek’s Cookbook community, the Discord gets quite busy at times, and there’s now enough geeks on board that I don’t end up answer every question myself, which is great to see.

I’ve dabbled with “livestreaming”/”livecoding” – last night I had an audience of 4 geeks watching me configure Lidarr with NZBHydra – thrilling stuff!

Oh, and my new darling, Prometheus/Grafana – I’ve been building on the “swarmprom” stack , adding prometheus exporters for nvidia GPU stats, Emby, Nginx, etc

funkypenguin 

I’m planning on doing Geek’s Cookbook Vol II – The Kubernetes Edition, although how I combine this all into the same content structure is YTBD.

One of the challenges with either Swarm or Kubernetes is that it’s very hard to have the original source IP of the miner visible to your pool, because of all the layers of load balancing and NAT that applied. This means that you can no longer ban bad/misconfigured miners by IP address (because you don’t have their IP address). I haven’t found a failsafe solution for this yet, but I have an open bounty for providing a way to ban miners based on TRTL address, rather than IP address. I also had to add a workaround to the pool software to bypass the IP-address-check which you’d normally have to pass, in order to enable/disable email notifications.

RockSteady

If you had to make an appeal to miners out there wanting to spread out the hashrate some, what would be an advantage of choosing your pool?

funkypenguin

While I originally tried to “corner the market” on an NZ / AU pool, truth is that the latency to NZ has no impact on blocks found, in real world observation. 90% of our pool hash (@Slash-atello) is from the US. So I’d appeal to TRTL miners (worldwide) who are also into microservices / homelab / self-hosting (and LEGO, high-fiving @bruceleon) to not just mine with us but come and “geek out” with us in Discord at http://chat.funkypenguin.co.nz

RockSteady

I think I’ve got everything we need, is there anything you wanted to add that I may have missed?

funkypenguin

Probably yet (yet another) acknowledgement that the “secret sauce” in TRTL, which stands out from other coins, is the focus on community and fun. Thanks for welcoming me

RockSteady 

Thanks for being a part of this experience!

Continue Reading →

Interview w/ SoreGums from TRTL Core Team

A while back we used to do an interview series called Out Of The Shell. This was a series of interviews done by an actual journalist, Gigantomachia, who would pull aside members of the community for an article, and when it was over the person being interviewed would pick another member to be next. The series was great, but sometimes life gets in the way, and this interview with SoreGums sat on the shelf for a few months.

I never want good content to go to waste, and I’m sure you guys would love to read it, so here’s the interview with a member of our core team, SoreGums.

This will be the last “Out of the Shell”, but it is far from the last interview, enjoy!

How’d you first learn about TurtleCoin?

I first learned about it via the Kevin Rose podcast BlockZero: #003 – TurtleCoin – The next Dogecoin?.

What was it about the coin that drew you in. Why are you involved in TurtleCoin as opposed to the other coins out there?

I listened to that episode during the 1st week of Feb 2018, then joined Discord. For the first 48hrs checked out everything and sat in #help and assisted others finding their way. Poked around the dev channels and ended up with contributor access to the Meta repo to help with issues there and got a dev-role tag as well. This level/kind of openness in projects is uncommon. I was also involved in discussions and liked the atmosphere and am now here for good. Other projects in this field pretty much have an agenda, and the dev teams don’t encourage outside involvement. I don’t like writing code; I can, I’m not great at it (as measured by speed and regurgitating things from memory – like on a whiteboard). My skill set is figuring things out (know how to find what is needed, be it tools, utilities, platforms, etc. and then put them together) and providing a way forward. I also like writing documentation. I very much enjoy supporting teams rather than being the star or leader.

Also, TurtleCoin is very much a currency application which runs on the TRTL Network. This distinction is relatively new (June 2018), however, has been in the roadmap from the start, see the Karai milestone. The appeal here then for me is getting in amongst it at a level that requires a fundamental understanding of how this all works. Primarily a learning opportunity, I am a believer in continued learning/development is essential for avoiding depression and being “happy” (to put it in simple terms).

How long have you been interested in crypto?

First got into it April 2011, bought 3x AMD GPUs to start mining Bitcoin. It seemed like it would be a thing. Would have been great if I believed that with conviction, haha.

So you gave up early?

About HODL. Always been following. Been moving around a lot, electricity vs reward at the time etc. I’m a member of the “if only” club of 2017 (BTC price surge etc.). I traded in 40BTC for an Amazon gift card to buy eBooks etc. Still worth it, however, in hindsight, 40*20k is a large number, that would have been nice. Now, 7yrs later it’s visible traditional central banking will be impacted. Blockchain genie is free, an energy-efficient application of it will need to be figured out long-term though.

Have you been involved in any other crypto project before TurtleCoin?

Not like with TurtleCoin. On BitcoinTalk, I was pretty vocal in the Coino Coin project, which died due to the core dev team being two people and real life got in the way. It was also a fast block project, ran into problems with that and the size of the blockchain database. It is funny, Dash, Digibyte, Coino all started around the same time. The core idea of fast blocks and what that enables is why I am so interested in TurtleCoin.

I’m as involved in TurtleCoin as I am because of how the project works and the people attracted to this way of working. I’ve been able to engage in discussions and contribute some value, that is accepted. Then the reason this is a thing is that the project has a focus on the platform as a tool, rather than a way to get rich quick (funny how incentives dictate actions/behaviour). Which leads to the people, we seem to be evenly distributed across the globe teaming up as it were on common end-goal objectives. Everyone I’m actively involved with comes at the work via the collaborative, open, straightforward, humble, mindset.

You’ve mentioned being interested in fast block times a few times. What about fast block times interests you and what do they enable?

Everyday transactions, the only way any cryptocurrency is going to become “the way everyday transactions are conducted” is if they are instant or close enough. In Australia/New Zealand they have self-service checkouts at the supermarket, NZ has self-service petrol pumps, a financial transaction needs occur to complete the sale as it were. So fast block times matter, no one is going to adopt a new way that requires them to stand around for more than 5secs before they can go. Thus immediate responses from the network are essential (fundamentally there doesn’t need to be fast block times, however as a building block it is a logical place to work from/at). Bitcoin is getting instant transactions via technology like lighting network, which briefly means people between the purchaser and seller guarantee amounts are moving from purchaser to seller instead of the network directly (over-simplified, general idea).

So practically how all this works is like this. A transaction broadcast to the network is the equivalent of authorisation in the current visa/card networks. This authorisation is saying “these funds have been allocated FROM this account TO this other account”, allocated means on the way to the destination, (privacy coins, of which TurtleCoin is one, only the sender and receiver know the FROM and TO parties) and is instant. In the visa/card networks at this point the sale is, and everyone moves on, the purchaser has their items, and the seller is confident they’ll receive the funds/the transaction will settle (funds show up in the clear in their account, arrived at destination), eventually as guaranteed by legal contracts etc. In the blockchain world, this is a little bit tricky as there is no guarantee by anyone that these broadcasted transactions will ever be settled/confirmed.

Settlement in blockchain tech comes in the form of included transactions in blocks, fast block times mean these blocks, and thus transactions being confirmed happens fast. Each time a block is produced from when the transaction was first included in the blockchain is an additional confirmation that the funds moved from one account to another. For TurtleCoin the target time for block production is 30 seconds. This means within 20 minutes a seller can be confident they will have the funds (technically they have the funds within 30 seconds). Contrast this to the Visa/card networks the seller needs to be cautious because the funds could be taken back up 90 days or even more depending on the card network and agreements etc., for various reasons. It is challenging in the blockchain world for a purchaser to take back the amounts they have sent as the confirmations continue to accumulate, there is no authority to turn to mediate on their behalf.

That is a super long answer however it is not often explained in detail for everyday people to make the connection between block times and how Visa/card networks operate. TRTL Network has attracted a lot of regular people due to how the community and project members interact with each other, so perhaps someone will find the above details useful.

Having code that enables fast block times isn’t the only factor that would lead to actual real-world adoption of TurtleCoin. What do you think needs to happen beyond the code for this to take off?

Utility. It is the answer to all blockchain adoption. TurtleCoin has it as a premise, however, in practice, it is still in the infancy stages. Once the TRTL Network Spec is defined, it’ll allow anyone to write any code that speaks to all nodes in the network. Said another way, the current TurtleCoind daemon can be replaced by some system that works perfectly for the people writing the code, and they will be able to interact with the TRTL Network just fine.

As for specific things that could promote real-world adoption, supplement all transactions that happen via cash with TurtleCoin transactions. It is going to take business relationships of the community to make that happen. One thing that will help any of those conversations is the access to reliable APIs, so the barrier to entry is as low as possible. I am talking about web wallets or platforms that act like web wallets. Just so happens that one such platform is under development by Fexra (GitHub/Discord). Fexra is building out a web wallet platform that enables merchants to integrate with the TRTL Network without having run, own and operate independent infrastructure and at least in the beginning, and this is needed. As the TRTL Network project progresses and standard tools are developed and released under the “Turtle Pay” heading, being able to find TurtleCoin and then be offering it the next day as a way to exchange value, this is what encourages adoption: ease of use; security; etc.

What do you do IRL? Career? Student?

I’ve been in IT since leaving high school in 2002. My predominant occupation is taking care of my son; he’s 1yr old. So am blazing my path doing different things here and there, IT related.

What are you doing in Vietnam?

I’m supporting a tourism company to attract foreigners, via native English website. They are a successful Vietnamese domestic tourism company.

What’s your favorite pizza?

Italian, from Italy; a bit of sauce, some fresh cheese, something green. Loved visiting there a few years ago, missed it immediately when we crossed the border to France. French delis are amazing, eating out of a deli all the time while possible, would not be ideal.

Any particular projects or initiatives you’re working on right now where you’re seeking community input?

I’m an analyst and details focused type of person that can also zoom out to verify the big picture as well. As such infrastructure and breaking down how things work has me focused on developing the project Krang. It is a Blockchain Automation Testing Suite, which means standing up infrastructure automatically and running tests on it, measuring results and creating reports. Said in plain language, turning on multiple computers, installing all the needed software for the blockchain network to function and checking how things run and writing about/reporting on it.

Krang will work for TRTL Network first, then move onto other blockchain projects. There are a bunch of goals that get covered by the above being real. It means we can automatically test releases before pushing them out. We can check for regressions in performance or even benchmark to figure out where we could make performance improvements. It enables us to test the theoretical parts with ease. It allows us to test different network attack scenarios with ease and assist in developing mitigations.

It is considered a massive project regarding what it enables. There will be a fair amount of code created to package all the standard tools and even more documentation written to allow others to use Krang or further extend it. The actual work to be done though is standard practice in organisations that prefer measured/ correct results, rather than guesses.

So if the above appeals to you, ping me on Discord. One other fellow in Australia is also involved and enjoys working on the infrastructure puzzle.

Now that TurtleCoin has been listed with CoinMarketCap what do you think that increased exposure might mean for TRTL.

I think it mostly signals a validation of the work being done. The group of contributors to the project is expanding each week. For them to be seeing that the project is getting positive attention will help with the positive feedback loop. For the users of the network and future users, it is also a positive signal.

There is a dark side to CoinMarketCap in that their timing on information updates has been shown to be self-serving and would encourage people to seek alternative data points instead of relying solely on CMC. One such site is CoinGecko.com, since TurtleCoin’s inception, the project has climbed up the developer ranking there and now (2018-09) TRTL is ranked 26. Slow and steady is the TurtleCoin motto, we’re here for the long term. The openness of TurtleCoin in terms of accepting contributions is great and wide, the project might be viewed at first glance as being a bit of a lark with its meme coin start, however, it is serious about the technology and the utility it is seeking to enable.

One of the projects primary objectives is to educate anyone interested in blockchain technology, either as a user or as a developer. As such the more exposure we get the more people we’ll be able to impact and give people a real handle on what this technology is all about so they can feel empowered and be an active participant in this new world. Like how the internet has connected everybody on the planet, it was the realm of the nerds when it started, blockchain technology needs to have some of the nerd transformed and made accessible for everyone.

Also…When you’re not working or hanging out in the TurtleCoin discord, what do you like to do for fun?

Go to the movies, went to see Deadpool 2 the other week. The first one was best, the second was good fun and entertaining as well, it is based on a comic series though, and well, it’s a bit hard to “out original” the original.

Travelling, reading, learning, visiting family, going out for the day, playing chess with my wife are some other things. Continue Reading →

CN Turtle Will Steal Your Girl

With all the commotion about the next fork upgrade, and the debut of our new hashing algo, CN Turtle, I wanted to make sure everyone has the run down about the fork upgrade before it arrives in a few weeks. Today, I got with IBurnMyCD who has been the lead on this algo and got a short interview about what is CN Turtle and what does it mean to me, both as a miner and a user.

If you’re a miner, a user, or a fan of fine rewritable optical media, I think you’ll enjoy this article. It was a fun interview. If you have any questions, just click this link and join us in the chat, we’re all here waiting on you.

RockSteady

@iburnmycd thanks for taking the time to do this interview. I wanted to get with you to discuss the upcoming fork upgrade in simple terms so our users know what’s in store for them.

First, what is the deal with this fork upgrade and why are we doing this?

iburnmycd

Thanks for having me @RockSteady (TRTL). It’s always an honour to help let the community that isn’t in the Discord all the time to catch the latest and greatest news. A while back, the project made the commitment to the community that the project would do its best to remain mineable for as many users as possible. Part of holding to that commitment is investigating, testing, implementing, and upgrading the Proof of Work used by the project. We’ve done this with experimenting with CN Soft Shell that a few forks of TurtleCoin have implemented and again with CN Turtle that we’re forking to at block 1,200,000. This upgrade is designed to help keep the project mineable for everyone by reducing the resource requirements necessary to mine. As a result, everyone will see higher hash rates which also means that there is a higher chance of solving a block as each miner will be producing hashes noticeably faster. However, there will be more hashes required (on average) to find a block. Our hope is that in the larger scope of things, this works out to be a win for the the littlest miners.

RockSteady

You mentioned our miners will be mining faster, what does that translate to for someone who has 100H/s of CPU power or another person who has 100H/s of GPU power?

iburnmycd

Based on testing, we estimate that miners will see on average an increase of anywhere between 3.0x and 4.0x for CPUs and 2.0x to 3.0x on GPUs. Personally, on my hardware I’ve observed a 3.8x increase on my CPU (AMD 1950x) and 2.8x on my GPU (AMD Vega64). However, not every CPU and GPU performs the same so the increase may be more or less than what we’ve observed. Variations in drivers, the mining software used, etc may result in higher or lower increases; however, what we can all agree on is that miners will see an increase in hashrate, no matter how small, due to the lower resource requirement and iteration count. On average a miner who was seeing 100H/s on CPU may see approximately 350H/s and a miner seeing 100H/s on GPU may see approximately 250H/s after the upgrade takes effect.

RockSteady

That’s great news. Let’s say you’re a miner, what do you need to do to be ready? Are most major miners already ready to work? And what if you’re just a user, do you have to do anything?

iburnmycd

That depends on how you mine 🙂 If you’re a solo miner and you use the miner binary distributed with the project, you’ll need only upgrade to v0.12.0 once it’s released. The miner software will automatically switch to the new PoW algorithm when it’s time. If you’re mining with a pool, you’ll need to contact the pool operator or check their website to verify that they have upgraded their pool software for the upgrade. If they haven’t, you might want to give them a gentle reminder that they need to do so. In addition, you’ll want to make sure that you have the latest release of your favorite mining software. For instance, we’ve released the necessary updates for xmr-stak via trtl-stak (https://github.com/turtlecoin/trtl-stak/releases/latest) that has the updated algorithm available as cryptonight_turtle. In the coming weeks, we’ll submit a pull request to the main xmr-stak repo to support the change. We’re still working the kinks out of the automatic algorithm switch in the package but in the event we don’t work that in, a miner need only manually switch the algorithm, delete their CPU & GPU configs, and let the software do the rest. We’re still working on adding support into XMRig and hope to have that completed before the network upgrade. We’ve also received information that SRBminer has also implemented the algorithm. Users of that mining software will need to switch the algorithm over when it’s time. Everyone, miners or not, need to keep their eyes out for the v0.12.0 release of the project. Service Operators, home users, pool operators, and other services will need to upgrade to v0.12.0 well ahead of block 1,200,000 to be ready for the upgrade. For most users, this upgrade will be like any other upgrade that we’ve done where you drop the new version in and you’re good to go.

RockSteady

Whats the best way to see how long we have before the upgrade takes effect?

iburnmycd

The quickest and fastest way is to head on over to the official block explorer at https://explorer.turtlecoin.lol/ In the Network Stats area, you’ll see an area that says Next Network Upgrade In (est.) with the approximate number of days, hours, minutes, and seconds until the next network upgrade.

RockSteady

Thanks for taking a second to tell us about the fork upgrade, is there anything else you wanted to add?

iburnmycd

If you’re reading this and you are not on Discord, you should be. We’d love to have you. It’s the only way to get a real feel for the project and meet all the different personalities. If you want to help out, there’s plenty of different areas to check out from development, education, marketing, international groups, and everything in between. Discord is the best place to meet other cryptocurrency developers who share a passion for the technology and their projects. Besides, where else can you learn about codename Chukwa?

RockSteady

 Thanks

Continue Reading →

Mining Turtles in Spanish – Interview with CryptoHispano of Bytecanarias

Some time ago we began a series of interviews with pool owners who operated mining pools with unique flair about them, or who had ventured off the beaten path in what they offer their miners. The goal was to help decentralize the network’s mining power, which we actually accomplished. We still want to interview our service operators though, both because it’s fun and it helps you guys get to know those in your local community.

Speaking of local communities, today we have a special interview for those of you in our Spanish speaking community- an interview with CryptoHispano who operates a pool for our Spanish speaking miners. We’re very thankful to get to speak with them and happy to introduce you!

RockSteady

Thank you for taking the time to do this interview with the community, CryptoHispano. Your pool is special to us because you are one of the few who cater to a regional community, in this case, the Spanish-speaking community. How did you get started in mining, and if you don’t mind, tell us a bit about the Spanish-speaking mining community you’ve created.

Cryptohispano.net

Hi, thank you for this opportunity to explain about the Cryptohispano project. I started with a friend riding a rig and good investigating a bit of how it worked all that rig, the riser and all those strange words that I hear in this world. We started mining Eth until we reached the goal of two, in that period of learning, I met people for chats and with some I made good friendships in particular with Jorge who was a Dev from a company and commented why not set up our popio pool. I told him that I would help him as much as I can since I’m not a programmer and I do not know how to program. We said we are going to open a pool for the Hispanic community and from there cryptohispano.net was born a pool that is born to bring the cryptos closer to people who have problems with the language barrier, as I Carlos (bytecanarias) do not speak English nor what I write and I saw that it cost a lot to get information, that they explained how this was going, where it started, etc. I told Jorge we had the pool but everything will be in Spanish, to reach all those people who do not understand English very much or even do not master anything. So he got down to work and we set up a BCN pool with the bad luck that the ASISC went into BCN in the weekend and we had to leave or die, one of the members of the channel, a restless Raul, was always saying look at this model look at the other and in one of those named Turtlecoin, because we started looking at it and we lived with many people behind working on it and responding in time to doubts, Jorge said that these people are serious on GitHub all well ordered , explained step by step, a very clean code “This coin will be very good” so we lasso for the turtles.

After a month, due to work issues, Jorge left the project and I saw myself alone, so I started to investigate and ask and bother all those who were in the channel, in the end I found people who helped me with all the problems and I am very grateful that there are people who want to help. I help in what I can to all within my limitations since not knowing about programming I can only help with what I have learned. I also want to tell since I have the opportunity to ask me why the pool has the 1% fee and there are pools that are at 0% is something that I also wonder, because with the work that costs to keep the pool in operation, the rental of hosting and the hours of dedication that this requires I do not understand either. Thank the entire community that supports us and those who continue to do so. We will continue to strive to be a great community.

RockSteady 

Cryptohispano, you’ve been a very good gift to the Spanish-speaking miner community. What do you think TurtleCoin can do to engage the international community more effectively?

Cryptohispano.net 

Well, from my point of view I honestly would not know what to say, on the part of the miners, what I always hear them is that they would like the currency to rise or that there would be less suppley for it to rise in value more quickly. I think that for a coin to take value you need to use, understand both physical and online. For example, I accept crypts for the hiring of vps I think that if many were like this we would achieve that the cryptos had a real use and not of expectation.

What Turtlecoin could do or try is to find a way to use it so that it takes form and value. Supermarkets, neighborhood stores go looking for people who are willing to accept them like me.

RockSteady 

CryptoHispano, it has been a pleasure to interview you, and I hope our Spanish speakers will find a comfortable community mining with you!

Continue Reading →