Categories
Weekly Update

This Week In TurtleCoin (May 28, 2019)

In this episode we made it to the papers when over 50,000 system administrators were found to be incompetent (hey ma!) In other news, water also wet.

On the bright side, Home Depot is hiring all positions

Developer Updates

If you’d like to submit your dev update to the roundup, fill out this form https://goo.gl/forms/BNaRYkUmOVOa1apQ2

trtlrig

trtlrig

Good news! I spent a bit of time over the holiday weekend and wired up the xmrig fork trtlrig to support Chukwa (Argon2id) CPU pool mining. I’ve tested it on Windows and a few different flavors of *nix. @LeoCuvée also mentioned that he tested it on ARM. Overall, it’s ready to go but I’m sure that someone will come around and fine a few enhancements to squeeze a bit more hashrate out of it but it’s an awesome start.

https://github.com/turtlecoin/trtlrig/tree/add_chukwa

iburnmycd

node-turtle-pool

node-turtle-pool

As part of testing trtlrig, I verified that all of the necessary updates for turtle-pool are complete for Chukwa. Everything needed has been merged into the development branch if you’d like to set up a testnet and pool for testing yourself.

https://github.com/turtlecoin/node-turtle-pool/tree/development

iburnmycd

Successfull build and test of the Chukwa TRTLrig on SBC

In the past few days, we managed compile and test the TRTLrig for the Argon2id Chukwa algo which TurtleCoin will fork to at block 1,800,000.

For our testing, we have used slightly different parameters than those that will be used by TurtleCoin (512kb memory, 3 iterations).

For our test, we worked together with @CapEtn of WRKZCoin, which will use 256kb memory and 4 iterations. Results?

Partly pleasing, partly requiring further optimizations.

The RK3328 chip that runs the Rock64 boards (which we use for our SBC nodes) gets a very nice bump. The increase is from underperforming slow 310 h/s on cryptonight-turtle to 550 h/s on Chukwa 256/4.

We also tested on the cryptonight-turtle best performer OrangePI One Plus, which is based on the Allwinner H6. Unfortunately, we could not seem to get any increase in hash rate on Chukwa 256/4 for this board, quite the opposite.

The OrangePI One Plus that otherwise excells on cryptonight-turtle (750 h/s) and actually does less on chukwa 256/4, specifically 623 h/s, no matter what we tried so far.

Well, there is a room for improvement! Slow & steady!

LeoCuvée#1481

Wallet sync speed improvements

Wallet sync speed improvements

As mentioned last roundup, I planned on working on multi-threading the sync process for wallets. This has now been completed and merged, and has given some decent speed gains.

Wallet syncing should now scale up to the number of cores you have (Provided you’re using the latest code and either wallet-api or zedwallet-beta). We’re now bottlenecked solely on how fast we can retrieve blocks from the daemon. Because of this, we don’t see huge increases in speed – as most of the time, we’re just waiting for more blocks rather than using all our threads.

However, if you have a less powerful device that previously was CPU bottlenecked – For example, a raspberry pi or other SBC, this should result in some more significant speed improvements.

Unfortunately, when using a remote daemon, threading does very little in terms of increasing sync speeds. This is a good reason to run a local daemon, especially on an SSD, if you want your wallet to sync super quick!

As you can see from the image above, with 12 threads and a local daemon, you can sync a wallet with over 10k transactions in under an hour.

https://github.com/turtlecoin/turtlecoin/pull/821

Zpalm

turtlecoin-crypto

turtlecoin-crypto

Some advancement has been made on the stand alone crypto module that includes all of the necessary code in a nice, tight, static library for performing any crypto/hash related functions used within the Core project.

  1. Implemented a wrapper that passes all data into and out of the methods as strings to make it easier to link up to the library instead of having to carry a whole bunch of structs around.
  2. Added Chukwa support
  3. Improved Windows build process so that it creates a shared library (.dll) with the export definitions defined so that it can be linked against by other projects “easily”. See #dev_canticore for it’s first use (when he’s ready).
  4. Working to combine all of the turtlecoin-crypto repos (JS/Node.js/WASM) library builds into a single repo.
  5. Much, much, more.

https://github.com/turtlecoin/turtlecoin-crypto

iburnmycd

turtlecoin-multi-hashing

turtlecoin-multi-hashing & turtlecoin-cryptonote-util

Again, to support trtlrig & pool testing for Chukwa, the Node.js turtlecoin-multi-hashing & turtlecoin-cryptonote-util packages heavily used by pools and the like have been updated to support Chukwa (Argon2id). This package has been published to NPM and GitHub and is ready for widespread use.

https://github.com/turtlecoin/node-cryptonote-util

https://github.com/turtlecoin/node8-multi-hashing

iburnmycd

Dockerized TurtleCoin with TTYD

Dockerized TurtleCoin with TTYD

I recently came across a cool program called TTYD that shares a terminal with the web and decided to integrate it into my docker projects. I initially started with TurtleCoind and, after realizing how easy easy it was, quickly moved on to zedwallet. Once those two were completed I was able to create a docker-compose file that spun up both services on the same network, allowing you to view the TurtleCoind output and interact with zedwallet via a browser. At this point I was kind of taken with TTYD and decided to start containerizing some of the other terminal based community projects using this new (to me at least) shiny toy.

Words don’t really do this any justice. If you’re familiar with Docker and want to see it in action, jump to the run commands down below. If, on the other hand, you’ve been pushing off learning Docker, never understood what the hype is about, or never heard of it? Stop right now and go download it here. Seriously, go do it, I’ll wait. And while you’re at it install Docker Compose too. In the meantime, I’ll gush about some of the things that I think makes Docker cool.

Docker containers are standardized so we don’t need to worry about our environment, like finding and installing the right libraries on our host machine, to get the software up and running. They are portable and reusable in the sense that they can be easily pulled, started, stopped, or removed when needed (which is great for trying out new software). We can run multiple containers and allow them to communicate and share data with each other over isolated networks. We are able to mount files/folders located on the host within our containers which makes development easier. The list goes on, but enough of my fanboying let’s get started.

Now that you have Docker installed let’s spin up a container that runs TurtleCoind. Open up your terminal and run:

docker run -d -p 7681:7681 -p 11897:11897 --name turtlecoind-ttyd -v turtlecoind:/home/turtlecoin/ andrewnk/turtlecoin:turtlecoind-ttyd

Now access http://localhost:7681. After a few moments, you should see a terminal pop up and the familiar output of the TurtelCoind daemon.

But what about zedwallet, you say? Try it out with this command:

docker run -d -p 7682:7681 --name zedwallet-ttyd -v turtlecoind:/home/turtlecoin/ andrewnk/turtlecoin:zedwallet-ttyd

Then access http://localhost:7682.

Pretty cool, right? Using this setup we won’t be able to actually use zedwallet though, because we haven’t provided a node for it to connect to. Before moving on, remove both containers we just created, by running the command:

docker rm -f turtlecoind-ttyd zedwallet-ttyd

Using Docker Compose we are now going to run both containers connected to each other on an isolated network and accessible via the browser.

First you need to save the file that contains the “instructions”, then use docker-compose to spin everything up. Download this docker-compose.yml file and save it as docker-compose.yml. Then in your terminal navigate to the file and run:

docker-compose up -d

Once everything is up and running you can navigate to http://localhost:8080 to see TurtleCoind and to http://localhost:8181 to use zedwallet. You are now running the daemon and can use zedwallet as you normally would. In this instance all the data (TurtleCoind and zedwallet files) will be stored in a folder, created by the containers, on your host machine titled turtlecoin.

When you’re done playing you can destroy the containers and network by running:

docker-compose down

This is just a quick overview of what can be done. Each image can accept a wide array of variables to customize your container.

So far, I have created TTYD images for:

  • miner
  • Turtle CLI py
  • Turtle Network CLI
  • TurtleCoin Test Suite
  • TurtleCoin Wallet NodeJS (Divine)
  • TurtleCoind
  • TurtleCoind HA
  • zedwallet

Check out the repo at: https://github.com/andrewnk/turtlecoin-docker

If you have any questions, are interested in contributing, or have a suggestion for another dockerized community project then hit me up on discord.

https://github.com/andrewnk/turtlecoin-docker

andrew | trtl.rocks

Rig Of The Week

If you’d like to submit your rig to Rig Of The Week, send us your info here: https://goo.gl/forms/GkDSoP3fERBWm8aJ2

Home mining

Describe this rig! Give us as much detail for your post as possible.

13 amd video cards – 7970 rx550 rx570 rx580

What are your secret tips and tricks about mining TRTL?

Ubuntu, xmr-stak/xmrig, ask in discord and forums, read all the stuff ppl have to say in answer, then read everything else everywhere. to the nvidia fans: theres a ‘better than equivalent’ with 2gpus on my AMD cards. lol imho lol

Introduce yourself

Started mining as hobbyist . Want to get better result through mining

What is the hashrate of this rig?

115 khs

Bounty Watch

Bounties are a great way for motivated people to get things done! To submit your bounty, click here: https://goo.gl/forms/mkNv27sJtv1nHPtx2

Bounty: Chukwa (Argon2id) GPU Miner Support

Bounty: Chukwa (Argon2id) GPU Miner Support

Requirements: – Add GPU mining capabilities to any open source miner package with Pool support – Must support, at minimum, CUDA (NVIDIA) and all current OpenCL (AMD) cards including Vega – Must include benchmarking ability – Must include hash tests (see below for input and expected output) that complete successfully Acceptance Criteria: – Must meet the requirements above – Must be pushed to a public GitHub repository – Must honor all aspects of existing licenses – Must remain open source – Must pass tests on multiple GPU platforms Hint: You may find inspiration and/or basic support for hooking this up via https://gitlab.com/omos/argon2-gpu Input Data:

0100fb8e8ac805899323371bb790db19218afd8db8e3755d8b90f39b3d5506a9abce4fa912244500000000ee8146d49fa93ee724deb57d12cbc6c6f3b924d946127c7a97418f9348828f0f02

Expected Hash:

c0dad0eeb9c52e92a1c3aa5b76a3cb90bd7376c28dce191ceeb1096e3a390d2e

2,000,000 TRTL

Contact RockSteady for further details.

TREZOR HW WALLET community firmware

TREZOR HW WALLET community firmware

What: Make a community Trezor firmware for Trezor One or T or both in order to store private keys safely, send and receive TRTL.

Why: We can’t have official integration merged in their master branch, however they suggested we can fork their code and make our own and first community Trezor firmware ever. In addition if that happens, they would like to promote it in media.

3,500,000 TRTL

Contact Elkim for further details.

Community Advertising

Click here to submit your free ad: https://goo.gl/forms/mkNv27sJtv1nHPtx2

  • Hey turtles, I created a new exchange featuring your favourite cryptonote coins: TRTL, DEGO and more coming. Create an account today and start trading. 😉 – We’re still in beta phase – ping @fipsi in our Discord if something isn’t working – https://discord.gg/xm4rfWF https://tradelly.co
  • CuvéeTurtle Pool located in the heart of Europe (Prague), with fast connectivity and scalable hardware platform (ARM-based SBC Cluster) is looking for you – miners like you of all shapes and sizes! Help us with our journey to grow our pool. You would still be one of our early adopters. Low payout limits. Our long-term commitment and friendly support by @Olé Cuvée himself. Pool web frontend webpage: https://publicnode.ydns.eu Join us now! Point your miner to publicnode.ydns.eu:5555 ./xmrig -a cryptonight-turtle -o 192.168.99.254:3333 -u TRTLxxxxxxxxx –donate-level 1 -p rig2 Flood us with some serious hash rate 🙂 No matter how much you throw at us, we will cope with it! https://publicnode.ydns.eu

Shoutouts

  • greywolf thanks to oiboo for rush delivery of special wolfhair mane oil
  • greywolf shoutout to zpalmtree for never sleeping, and for always keeping a finger on the pulse of every channel
  • greywolf cheers for Sierra, who can always find the good in anyone, even the slimiest of worms
  • Quicky Chech out new web wallet Trtlfun. https://trtlfun.com/ Thanks
  • greywolf i wanna thank RockSteady for mentioning possible porting of TurtleCoin to FreeBSD. it sparked an interest, and now i’ve got a running 12.0-RELEASE system with a working window manager 🙂
  • Dreday000 Shout to the community, Just want to say good job TurtleFam
  • Elkim Thanks Oiboo for the awesome Hairy Turtle beard elixir!
  • Rock Shouts out to Krebs on Security and Kaspersky for not smearing us too much in their latest articles. Shouts out to Kaspersky more though for actually spelling our name right though.. Also, special reminder to keep your systems up to date, lest you become what the Chinese call «Les incompétents»
Categories
Weekly Update

This Week In TurtleCoin (FEB 10, 2019)

In this better late than never edition of the weekend roundup, we test our skills of survival while waiting for the Comcast guy!

Developer Updates

TurtleCoin + Alpine + Docker – I’ve managed to get the TurtleCoin binaries to compile on Alpine. There were a couple of issues that were preventing this. The first issue is that ucontext was deprecated in POSIX which musl adheres to. Thankfully someone had created a library that solves the problem. The second issue was that musl has a PAGE_SIZE macro defined in limits.h that was conflicting with a parameter used on slow-hash.c. This has now been changed to page_size in the core, resolving the conflict. So far, I’ve created three images. The first image, which is meant to be a starting point for your own images, builds all the binaries in Alpine then copies them to a scratch container resulting in an image size of 22.6MB. The zedwallet container comes in at 7.96MB and the TurtleCoind image, which includes checkpoints, is only 90MB. I plan to create a series of docker-compose files that will tie them together to help accomplish various tasks. You can view the images on Docker Hub: https://hub.docker.com/r/andrewnk/turtlecoin or on github: https://github.com/andrewnk/turtlecoin-docker – andrew | trtl.rocks

https://github.com/andrewnk/turtlecoin-docker

Image result for unreal engine

Turtle Simulator UE4 – Turtle Simulator has now been uploaded to GitHub! If you want to help with the project, or if you if you are interested in game design, check out the code and give me a message in #Dev_gaming channel! Im looking for anyone who knows: 3d Modeling/ Animation/ UV maps. Coding in UE4, Blueprints or C++ Music /Audio Ideas / Level design It’s a massive project I’ve undertaken so any help takes something off my to-do list. Thanks in advanced! Looking forward to see what we can make together! Oiboo P.s No minimum skill level, all help will be appreciated! – Oiboo

https://github.com/Oiboo/TRTL-Simulator

TRTL.rocks – I’ve made several improvements and changes to the website. I made a silly logic error that caused the initial load time to vary drastically or stall altogether. If the node or pool API is not accessible, then it won’t be shown on the site. If you don’t see your node or pool in the list, this is most likely the reason. I’ve cleaned up the line chart, including formatting y-axis and point labels, which should help readability. I’ve added tooltips to most table headers that describe what the column represents. These can be turned on or off by toggling the Tooltips switch on the bottom right hand of the screen. Finally, I’ve added the ability to switch the line chart between live and historical data. On initial load, the live mode will be enabled and updates are displayed whenever the data is pushed from the database. I’m in the process of rewriting iburn’s blockexplorer-cache library to use sequelize, which will help me move on to the block explorer portion of the site. – andrewnk | trtl.rocks

https://github.com/andrewnk/turtle-explorer

Promote Your Bounty

500,000 TRTL – Currently I am seeking a pair of PHP hands that have the skill to implement some necessary connections to a particular API database, and implement it into a WordPress website. Not completely being able to foresee all the tasks but I believe it will be a one-time effort, realisable in a day, spread over two weeks. Please PM me for more information. – 476190.47619047

1,218,917 TRTL – Will buy developer license for Turtle wallet app – mikeykones

Fork Watch

Excelsior

The Celestial community called out.. And the call was answered. We couldn’t save the existing chain, so we re-forked, gave it a new name, and launched Excelsior on Sunday the 3rd of February. All the same network settings the previous dev. gave it, just a new name, logo, and updated codebase.
If you don’t know Celestial; it was the first coin using the CN Soft Shell algorithm, by TurtleCoin (now with Lite Blocks by Rashed!).
Supply; 1,700,000,000.00000
Premine; 11,000,000.00000 (for 1:1 swap for existing mined coins)
Block Reward; (Approx) 100.64280 XLS
Emission speed factor: 24
Find us on the web; http://xlscoin.info Join us in our Discord; https://discord.gg/rhfW9jZ

lithe-logo.png

Lithe™

It’s everything DASH intended to be but without Masternodes.
https://github.com/lithe-project

Community Advertising

2 nodes, twice the fun! turtle.japakar.com

Hey! I just wanted to remind you guys the best server to sync your wallet with is still turtlenode.online! Thanks! -Morpheus

Shoutouts & Thanks

Great support from Belorion in helping get the Nibblebox all in one miner running smoothly for NibbleClassic! – Sups

Shoutout Birmingham iron and the aaf!! Go Luis Perez 💪 – rogerrobers

Shout out to me, Dio! – khem Boi

Shouts out to IBMCD for his work with multisig! – rock

Categories
Weekly Update

This Week In TurtleCoin (Feb 4, 2019)

Developer Updates

I’ve managed to get the TurtleCoin binaries to compile on Alpine. There were a couple of issues that were preventing this. The first issue is that ucontext was deprecated in POSIX which musl adheres to. Thankfully someone had created a library that solves the problem. The second issue was that musl has a PAGE_SIZE macro defined in limits.h that was conflicting with a parameter used on slow-hash.c. This has now been changed to page_size in the core, resolving the conflict. So far, I’ve created three images. The first image, which is meant to be a starting point for your own images, builds all the binaries in Alpine then copies them to a scratch container resulting in an image size of 22.6MB. The zedwallet container comes in at 7.96MB and the TurtleCoind image, which includes checkpoints, is only 90MB. I plan to create a series of docker-compose files that will tie them together to help accomplish various tasks. You can view the images on Docker Hub – Andrew | trtl.rocks

https://hub.docker.com/r/andrewnk/turtlecoin or on github: https://github.com/andrewnk/turtlecoin-docker

 

trtl-rocks – I’ve made several improvements and changes to the website. I made a silly logic error that caused the initial load time to vary drastically or stall altogether. If the node or pool API is not accessible, then it won’t be shown on the site. If you don’t see your node or pool in the list, this is most likely the reason. I’ve cleaned up the line chart, including formatting y-axis and point labels, which should help readability. I’ve added tooltips to most table headers that describe what the column represents. These can be turned on or off by toggling the Tooltips switch on the bottom right hand of the screen. Finally, I’ve added the ability to switch the line chart between live and historical data. On initial load, the live mode will be enabled and updates are displayed whenever the data is pushed from the database. I’m in the process of rewriting iburn’s blockexplorer-cache library to use sequelize, which will help me move on to the block explorer portion of the site. – Andrew | trtl.rocks

https://github.com/andrewnk/turtle-explorer

Turtle Simulator has now been uploaded to GitHub! If you want to help with the project, or if you if you are interested in game design, check out the code and give me a message in #Dev_gaming channel! Im looking for anyone who knows: 3d Modeling/ Animation/ UV maps. Coding in UE4, Blueprints or C++ Music /Audio Ideas / Level design It’s a massive project I’ve undertaken so any help takes something off my to-do list. Thanks in advanced! Looking forward to see what we can make together! Oiboo P.s No minimum skill level, all help will be appreciated! – Oiboo

https://github.com/Oiboo/TRTL-Simulator

Promote Your Bounty

500,000 TRTL – Currently I am seeking a pair of PHP hands that have the skill to implement some necessary connections to a particular API database, and implement it into a WordPress website. Not completely being able to foresee all the tasks but I believe it will be a one-time effort, realisable in a day, spread over two weeks. Please PM me for more information. – 476190.47619047

Community Advertising

Hey! I just wanted to remind you guys the best server to sync your wallet with is still turtlenode.online! Thanks! -Morpheus

Shoutouts & Thanks

Sups – Great support from Belorion in helping get the Nibblebox all in one miner running smoothly for NibbleClassic!

funkypenguin – Shoutout to @Rock’s new avatar, which is scary-as-hell (gah, i changed it before i saw this – rock)

anon – fuck you rock i know u read this

dsanon – <3 the turtlecoin community.

anonymous – will you go to prom with me zpalm

 

Categories
Feature Story

FunkyPenguin’s Turtle Pool Secrets

A lot of you out there have questions about how pools work and what goes into running a successful one. Today we’re checking out an interview with FunkyPenguin who runs probably one of the coolest setups I’ve seen so far with all of the pools I’ve seen. Maybe I’m just a nerd, but I have a big appreciation for the way he’s doing things.

You’re gonna love this one!

art by Teacup

RockSteady
Thanks again for agreeing to the interview. The purpose of this interview is for us to highlight smaller pools that have unique things about them. Giving exposure to smaller pools is important in diversifying the hashrate. I hope today to hear about you, your pool, your history in mining and what a user might find unique about your pool.

funkypenguin 

Cool :smiley:

RockSteady

Your pool is a cool one, and I think the miners as well as developers will appreciate the unique qualities to it. You first came on my radar with some of the interesting infrastructure work you were doing behind the scenes. I’d like to get in to that soon, but first, tell us how you got involved in TurtleCoin, and what led to you running a pool.
(I’ve documented this here: https://www.funkypenguin.co.nz/opinion/what-is-turtlecoin-and-why-do-i-care/), but here’s the off-the-cuff version
I was opportunistically looking for coins to mine after the Monero Cryptonight v7 fork, so I spent some time on cryptunit.com. Every so often, I’d see “TurtleCoin”, and laugh at what a silly name it was, and how ridiculous the crypto space had become.
Somewhere (maybe Reddit) I saw the headline for the BlockZero (Kevin Rose) podcast featuring TurtleCoin, and the name triggered some brand recognition. The level of respect that Kevin had for the project, and the way “community” was highlighted, changed my initial skeptical opinion, and I jumped into the Discord
I felt that I wanted to be more than another opportunistic miner, and that a “baby” cryptocurrency was a good place to start learning. (There was no NZ mining pool)
I’d already spent 6-8 months building my Geek’s Cookbook (a collection of self-hosted apps running within Docker Swarm), and wondered whether I could build a TurtleCoin mining pool. I figured I should start with a testnet, so I started asking some questions in #dev_general, and @SoreGums pointed me in the right direction. I ended up submitting a PR for a testnet Docker instance of the TurtleCoin daemon which could be used to create a testnet in total isolation from mainnet.
Having built a testnet, I started working on the mining pool, learning about wallet/daemon/redis/pool, and how they interrelate. I wrote up the Docker Swarm design (a bit outdated now).
There were some interesting challenges re how the pool components talked to each other, some of which lined up very well with the “one-process-per-container” model of Docker. I sort of fell into it from there, started mining in my pool, discovered that I could advertise in #mining , posted my pool to r/TRTL a few times, and enjoyed the process of mining “together” with other geeky crypto enthusiasts

RockSteady

It’s great that you’ve documented your journey the whole way, and as a microservice nerd in my own life, I feel a personal respect for what you’ve done.
funkypenguin
(To be honest, I also want to profit from crypto, and I figured I’d leverage my systems experience to build pools to amass some coins, rather than strictly mining-and-selling-and-hodling)
You’ve got a cool frontend on your pool, and as I remember, you were one of the first to have the new-style interface. What are some of the unique qualities of your pool that would be interesting to a miner looking to diversify their hashrate some?
I polled my miners on this question, asking “what features does a miner really care about?”. The best response was from @slashatello, who said “miners care about.. BLOCKS”. I was interested in the telegram/email notifications from https://github.com/dvandal/cryptonote-nodejs-pool, which remain my favourite feature. Here’s an example:
That looks cool, break it down for me- what’s going on in that pic?

funkypenguin

11:57 : The pool restarted (I’m running turtlecoind-ha, that’s another story), my rig connected
12:04 : The same again (this happens when the daemon gets stuck, it sometimes takes a few goes to restore stability)
12:07 : One of the miners finds a block. Yay! Now we wait 20 min to confirm it’s not an orphan
12:11 : Yes, daemon restarts again
12:29 : Block is not orphaned, now is the first time (based on these notifications) we see what our effort was (43%). Unlike the original turtle-pool software, lower % is better, so we “found” this block in 43% of the time we’d statistically expect to (we were lucky)
<by this time, the wallet has received the block reward. Redis calculates how much each miner is due, and payments are prepared>
12:31 : The pool sends the miners their portions of the block reward (minus my 0.0987654321% fee), everyone is happy
(the fee is a funny story actually – when I first setup the pool, I looked at the list of pools and saw someone else’s pool listed as 0.0987..%. I thought it was a clever attention-grabbing move, so I adopted it for myself. I think I read later that it was just a math bug!)

RockSteady

That’s pretty funny, actually! Thanks for giving us the play by play. That’s a pretty intricate setup. So you’ve made a pool, and you’ve written guides and Dockerfiles for us, what don’t you do?! You’re awesome! What do you have planned for the future, and what are you interested in learning right now?

funkypenguin

Thank you :smiley: Well, this daemon restarting thing is a bit of a PITA, and the original platform I ran my swarm on was heavily contended at times, so I’ve just finished migrating the pool to a Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) cluster. I still have the occasional daemon issue (as evidenced above), but we seem to recover from a stalled daemon with a few quick restarts.
I overspeced the GKE cluster when I built it (I’m only using 22% of my resources for Turtle/Moneytips pools), so I’m currently playing with autoscaling the cluster, as well as using a “tainted” nodepool running (cheap) pre-emptive node instances for doing CPU-heaving stuff like syncing new coins blockchains. The fact that they’re pre-emptive means that Google could turn them off at any time, but the GKE engine would just spin me up a new one in a few min, and for the purposes of an initial blockchain sync, I don’t need to maintain any sort of availability
So I’m enjoying learning more about the world of Kubernetes / Terraform. I’m also continuing to build the Geek’s Cookbook community, the Discord gets quite busy at times, and there’s now enough geeks on board that I don’t end up answer every question myself, which is great to see.
I’ve dabbled with “livestreaming”/”livecoding” – last night I had an audience of 4 geeks watching me configure Lidarr with NZBHydra – thrilling stuff!
Oh, and my new darling, Prometheus/Grafana – I’ve been building on the “swarmprom” stack , adding prometheus exporters for nvidia GPU stats, Emby, Nginx, etc

funkypenguin 

I’m planning on doing Geek’s Cookbook Vol II – The Kubernetes Edition, although how I combine this all into the same content structure is YTBD.
One of the challenges with either Swarm or Kubernetes is that it’s very hard to have the original source IP of the miner visible to your pool, because of all the layers of load balancing and NAT that applied. This means that you can no longer ban bad/misconfigured miners by IP address (because you don’t have their IP address). I haven’t found a failsafe solution for this yet, but I have an open bounty for providing a way to ban miners based on TRTL address, rather than IP address. I also had to add a workaround to the pool software to bypass the IP-address-check which you’d normally have to pass, in order to enable/disable email notifications.

RockSteady

If you had to make an appeal to miners out there wanting to spread out the hashrate some, what would be an advantage of choosing your pool?

funkypenguin

While I originally tried to “corner the market” on an NZ / AU pool, truth is that the latency to NZ has no impact on blocks found, in real world observation. 90% of our pool hash (@Slash-atello) is from the US. So I’d appeal to TRTL miners (worldwide) who are also into microservices / homelab / self-hosting (and LEGO, high-fiving @bruceleon) to not just mine with us but come and “geek out” with us in Discord at http://chat.funkypenguin.co.nz

RockSteady

I think I’ve got everything we need, is there anything you wanted to add that I may have missed?

funkypenguin

Probably yet (yet another) acknowledgement that the “secret sauce” in TRTL, which stands out from other coins, is the focus on community and fun. Thanks for welcoming me :smiley:
RockSteady 
Thanks for being a part of this experience!