Categories
Weekly Update

This Week in TurtleCoin (March 25, 2019)

Developer Updates

Soft Shell Pool Mining – I’ve update the soft-shell algo with a minor tweak to allow for xmr-stak (and other mining software in future) to handle the scratchpad changes at each height, can see this minor tweak here: https://github.com/turtlecoin/turtlecoin/commit/688087f60dc16b7f6ebfce41287b474cf56f67b5.
Trtl-stak has been updated to include the ability to mine Soft-shell and I’ve updated the pool software to send down the required params to the mining software as part of the pool job. – WhassupZA

https://github.com/turtlecoin/trtl-stak/pull/8

image: LeoCuvée

TurtleCoin CuvéeARM Pool Update – “Since the last update, our TurtleCoin CuvéeARM Pool made it out of the shell and does its first baby steps cautiously.
Blimey, as of today, we’ve got 8 loyal miners (out of those special thank you Paul, Mira, Vasek and @thinkpol#5064) – attributing to a pool hash rate of aroud 135kh/s. That’s up from 1 miner (myself) and a decent 35kh/s hashrate from three weeks ago!
Mind you this all runs on a decent single-board computer (OrangePI One Plus).

We thought we would torture this board with placing all the components to this board – the TurtleCoin node, the Redis db, the turtle-service, the pool software itself and all we would mine would be hot air from orphaned blocks in our cellar-based lab … And no, it’s just running and running (almost 14 days uptime), we’ve mined 32 blocks at the time of writing, no orphaned blocks (yet!) and the board happily idling, waiting for more miners to join! This proves a viable solution. – @LeoCuvée#1481

Mobile wallet – Not much to report this week. v0.0.6 went out which had a number of bug fixes and enhancements, hopefully that has arrived on your devices by now.
I think I found the source of some database bugs which were causing crashes, or wallets failing to open, that’ll be coming in the next release.
If you have an enhancement you’d like to see added to the wallet, please come leave an issue on GitHub 🙂 – zpalm

https://github.com/turtlecoin/turtlecoin-mobile-wallet/issues/53

Cuvée projects in the making (March 2019) – Times been busy currently at Cuvée. We run number of project for TurtleCoin on ARM-based Single Board Computers (SBCs).

The first project we started almost a year to date ago was a miner based on OrangePI One Plus. Among many other things back then, we’ve heard that TurtleCoin is a CPU-friendly coin, and we just had some boards as left-overs from a commercial project, so we decided to give this adventure a go. A year later and if memory serves us correct two algo changes, we still run a cluster of 12x OrangePI One Plus, 4x OrangePI Zero Plus boards happily mining TurtleCoin at a combined hash rate of 10.5kh/s.

The second project we desperately wanted to make was a TurtleCoin node on the ARM platform. We briefed the TurtleCoin community earlier about the detective approach of hunting down the issue of daemon segfaulting, resulting into a successfull fix by TurtleCoin developers (thanks once again!). Now we run a public TurtleCoin node for syncing wallets (publicnode.ynds.eu:11898). The node runs on the new board called OrangePI 3. Additionally, we run two private TurtleCoin daemons on two separate OrangePI One Plus boards that serve our Cuvée TurtleCoin mining pool. We run a few other nodes for one of the coins that is a fork of TurtleCoin to support their journey (and opportunity for us to learn and experiment).

The third project we made (and still in the making) is Cuvée TurtleCoin Mining Pool. The mining pool runs again on our favourite board OrangePI One Plus, and si one of our nice surprises. We are really excited how well it runs. If you would like to strengthen us with some of your hash power, the pool runs on ports 3333, 5555 and 7777 again at our (temporary) address publicnode.ydns.eu

The fourth project, with the introduction of the TurtleCoin mobile wallet we started accepting TurtleCoin at our DT Lab & Hub premises in Prague for you to be to pay for coffee and any snacks available onsite when visiting our lab, co-working centre or attending one of workshops that we run.

What else we plan to launch on SBCs related to TurtleCoin?

  1. We will be launching server hosting services (Cuvée Physical Private Server – PPS) on ARM SBCs for which you could pay with TurtleCoin. Lots of building and testing currently ongoing. Soon we will be launching social network channels to share our journey with you.
  2. We will be offering ready-made plug & forget TurtleCoin products:
    a] your own private plug & forget TurtleCoin node with pre-synced blockchain against which you can synchronize your wallet, in slick black alu enclosure that contains the Rock64 SBC from Pine64 project.
    b] your own private mining pool pre-configured
    c] clustered-miner based on OrangePI One Plus SBCs (cluster of 3, 5 and 10 miners)
  3. All we do we will share with the TurtleCoin community on Discord and on our social media channels, as well as all code & images that we develop as part of our projects will be avaiable for everyone on GitHub.

Our long-term plan? We want to put together a TurtleCoin POS solution. Initial planning, looking for suitable components and drafting already started. Long way ahead though.
Stay tuned for regular Cuvée TurtleCoin project updates 🙂 @LeoCuvée

BountyBot – A project to better organize and list all available bounties. This will be a multi-server bot capable of handling a complete line of settings, custom command prefixes, and custom subdomain for showing a searchable index of bounties for your server. Current progress holds at 72% of desired features.

Special thanks to @fipsi | The Machine#0789 for the original base of the BountyBot.

This bot is being created in response to the Bounty listed by @anəki#0705 and @DiscoTim#3647 GitHub Source Coming soon” – TwixtedTurtle (@TwixtedChaox#9638)

https://www.github.com/TwistedStudiosLLC/BountyBot

Rig of the Week

Japakar’s rig, “Turtley”
Details: Its simple and small, but it works! Bronze 750watt power supply, xfx rx 570 8 gig, 8 gigs of ram
Hashrate: 5.5 kH/s (CN_Turtle)
Secret mining tips? Keeping the hands out of the pants and above the table.

Bounties

1000 TRTL – I need windows and mac binaries for my fork of turtlecoin please. @Monster(QPSA)

Community Advertising

Always find the cheapest node for your wallet! https://notrait.com/

On the go and need to sync your TurtleCoin wallet or make a transaction? Use our relieable, trusted and cutting-edge CuvéeARMTrtl public node at publicnode.ydns.eu:11898. It runs on OrangePI 3 hardware and only charges 19 TRTL per transaction.

After a few days of me not realizing, I am updated! Nodes 1 and 2 are back and working 100%! Sorry about that! turtle.japakar.com and turtle2.japakar.com http://turtle.japakar.com

Another paper wallet generator! It cant hurt to have too many of a good thing! http://turtlewallet.japakar.com

2 turtle nodes for your turtle pleasure! turtle.japakar.com and turtle2.japakar.com Thanks for using them! http://turtle.japakar.com

Shoutouts & Thanks

anon Zpalm is cute :>

greywolf thanks a bunch to the guys (always) talking in dev_general. i visit several times daily just to follow the different discussions. there is always something to learn.

greywolf thank you for the generous gift to my TonChan wallet, the turtle who sent this transaction: hash=e3fe4338309724c1e7e0b7e6724abc1530954159648218f6040a42efe060bb97

LeoCuvée #1481 Massive thank you to @zpalmtree for all his work on the Ton Chan mobile wallet. A big step forward for TurtleCoin in my humble personal view. Thank you!

@leocuvée Shout out to @Rogerrobers for this one – resonates with me 🙂 https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/471023390954618883/557346992427368460/unknown.png

SoreGums nice one Blyadman coming along and posting a PR for russian translation out of nowhere for the client side web wallet turtlecoin/turtlecoin-webwallet-js

japakar.com | turtle.japakar.com derogold.japakar.com toomuch.japakar.com Thanks to my fellow turtles! This place still rocks. Get it? Thanks for being there, for coming up with new ideas and for being the coolest group on Discord. Looking forward to another year.

anon shout out to alium you are no longer welcome in the lad compound

not rock – its okay alium they dont like me either

Categories
Feature Story

Ton Chan TurtleCoin Mobile Wallet Interview

One of the things that has been most requested of us is a mobile wallet. In the past we’ve always pointed mobile users to our web wallets, but a brave turtle came forward and put together a cool android wallet and we’re pretty stoked about that, so here’s an interview with the creator!


Image result for ton chan
A wild Ton Chan appears!

RockSteady: Zpalm, thanks for taking the time to do this interview. You’re the first person to come up with a mobile wallet- with us being a year in, why do you suppose nobody else came up with anything in this time? There must have been significant roadblocks.

Zpalm: There are a couple of things that make a mobile wallet tricky. The first one is that you need quite a lot of cryptography code. ed25519 libraries are pretty common, however, they normally don’t expose the primatives we need. Implementing this is not too tricky, but it’s quite a bit of work. I ported the C code to C# for turtlecoin-cs, and it was quite a pain to do. I didn’t need to do this for the mobile wallet, since I’m using the turtlecoin-utils library. This library takes the core C++ code, and compiles it to JavaScript. Since the mobile-wallet is written in typescript/javascript, that was a big chunk of code I didn’t have to write. You also need the core cryptographic functions for the wallet to operate, like creating key images, generating ring signatures, and so on. Secondly, actually managing a wallets operation is a little tricky. The sync process is relatively simple, once you understand how to piece together the different cryptographic operations, but there are quite a few pitfalls which can make you miss blocks when syncing, or miss transactions. I had already learnt a lot on how to design a wallet backend when I rewrote the C++ wallet backend, so porting that over to typescript wasn’t too much of a chore. The majority of the code of the mobile wallet is in that external backend library – the frontend is pretty easy to do, just a bit slow to get everything looking nice.

RockSteady: TonChan is an interesting name, where did that come from?

Zpalm: There’s a nice quote, ‘There are only two hard things in Computer Science: cache invalidation and naming things.’ Finding a cool name which is somehow based on turtles was a bit tricky, so I nabbed the name of a cute Turtle, called Ton or Ton-chan from an anime, K-ON!

RockSteady: What features have you seen others talk about? Anything you think is interesting enough to implement?

Zpalm: One of the things I really like and I think some other people have commented on is how easy the transfer process is. If the payee is already in your address book, it’s one tap along with entering the amount to send a transaction. I plan on making this even faster – I’m currently working on implementing support for QR codes which have an amount+name attached – this will allow you to scan one QR code, and it will add the user to your address book, and pop you right on the confirmation screen. This feature is also supported by TurtlePay, so I think that can help with adoption – It’s easy to use TurtleCoin to accept payments, and it’s easy for users to pay with as well. Other features that have been requested is address book management, fusion transactions, dark mode, and more. Most of them I had already planned to add (and haven’t got round to yet). The dark mode one was interesting – I thought it would be pretty trivial to implement, but it ended up being a bit of a pain getting the theme to apply everywhere when changed. This led to a redesign of the theming process, and now it’s would be pretty easy to add support for user created themes. I’m not sure how many people would make use of a feature like that, maybe we’ll see it added.

RockSteady: Great answer, can you tell us a bit about what the wallet can do currently, and what you have on the development roadmap?

Zpalm: The wallet is perfectly functional as a daily use wallet. It can send transactions, receive transactions, and view past transactions. Not that much more a wallet needs! However, there are a number of other features to make the experience nice to use. One feature I’ve really been liking, and I think other people have been too is the notifications. It’s a very simple feature, but it’s quite nice to get a notification whenever you get sent a transaction. The roadmap right now is adding a few more features like fusion transactions and fixing up a few bugs have been experiencing, then iOS support.

RockSteady: Id also like to talk a bit about development, whats the app written in? What was that process like, if you had to explain it to a non developer?

Zpalm: There’s a few components of the app. There’s the frontend, that’s the UI, and so on, that the users see. That’s written in JavaScript, using React Native – A framework to write apps for both iOS and Android using JavaScript. Then there’s the backend, which manages the syncing process, sending transactions, managing balance, and so on. That’s written in Typescript, which if you’re not aware, is basically JavaScript, with optional typechecking. Helps you avoid some easily fixable bugs, like using variables that aren’t defined. Finally, there’s a high performance section written in C++. The wallet syncing process is quite CPU intensive, and sadly, the JavaScript cryptography code is slow as molasses – It can process something like 1 block a second. This was one of the big roadblocks when implementing the wallet. What I ended up doing, is we take the block data in JavaScript/Typescript land, then pass it through to the Java ‘bridge’. Most android apps are written in Java, and this is where the real work in React Native goes on. From there, we can pass to the JNI (Java Native Interface), which lets us call C or C++ code. We process the block in C++, then pass the results back to Java, then finally back to JavaScript/Typescript. This adds a little bit of overhead, but ends up being a lot faster than processing in JavaScript – It’s something like 15-50 blocks a second, depending on your phones power. Still quite slow compared to desktop wallets, but hey, that’s one of the downsides of using a mobile.

Image result for ton chan

RockSteady: What was that process like, if you had to explain it to a non developer?

Zpalm: Writing the UI was pretty frustrating – Trying to get everything to line up nicely, and all coloured in a nice looking way. Since you’re lining things up by pixels, or percentages, instead of dragging and dropping, there’s a lot of changing a value, reloading, and seeing how it looks. I found sometimes I’d have spent 3 hours and only written 50 lines of code for a screen I was designing. I’m very pleased with the final outcome, but it is sloooow to get there. Writing the backend was business as usual, since it’s not locked to just mobiles, I could test this all out on a desktop, rather than an android emulator, which makes developing a lot faster. Since I had done most of this work in the C++ already, it was pretty trivial, just copying code over and converting into the typescript equivalent Writing the high performance code was painful. Since you were working in three different languages, it was a pain to figure out where in the process you had gone wrong. If you ever did anything wrong, you pretty much always got an app crash, rather than a helpful error. The documentation on how to use the API is pretty sparse, so there’s a lot of googling to figure out how to do something pretty simple. After a lot of scraping logs, finally got it doing the right thing. I was stumped for a few hours by accidentaly swapping two parameters around

RockSteady: Given the popularity of the android app, do you think there’s interest in an iOS app, and what hurdles do you think someone might face in implementing it on iOS? Is there anything they could learn from your journey with the Android app?

Zpalm: Certainly, one of the most requested things is an iOS app. Since the wallet uses React Native, which is cross platform, there’s not that much that needs doing for iOS support. The main thing we need is to implement the high performance C++ code in iOS as well – since the Java/JNI stuff is android only. Since iOS uses objective C, which is a superset of C (All C code is valid Objective C code), this shouldn’t be too tricky – but I might have to change from C++ to C, which could be a pain. We’ll also need to make sure that everything looks good, and fits with the iOS theme – they have a few differences, and we want to try and make the wallet feel like a native iOS app, if possible. There’s a few things which I’m not sure what the iOS pattern is – like ‘Toast’ notifications on Android (Those little messages which pop up in a bubble at the bottom of your screen) that we’ll need to add.

RockSteady: How many people have downloaded TonChan so far? Have there been any interesting bugs reported? What is the best way someone can contribute to the project?

Zpalm: Google play is telling me 104, it takes a little time to update but that’s already a decent amount for something released only a week or two ago. The most interesting bug is probably the wallet sync slowing down when you swapped tabs – I think I fixed that one, but it was quite puzzling at first. The best way to contribute is to leave an issue on the github if you see something not working, or something that you think could be improved, which as much info as possible. Of course, if you’re a developer yourself, you could try and fix it too!

RockSteady: Tell me a bit about TonChan’s relationship w/ TurtlePay, I heard there’s something in the pipeline regarding fees

Zpalm: TurtlePay and TonChan work very well together in my opinion, TurtlePay making it easy to request payments, and TonChan making it easy to send payments. We’re going to waive any fees (other than the mandatory network fee) for TurtlePay transactions to help guide adoption.

RockSteady: That’s a pretty solid description, what advice do you want to give the person who ports it to iOS?

Zpalm: I hope iOS gives better errors when native code breaks than Android! I forgot to mention this earlier, but background syncing is another big hurdle for the wallet. When using React Native, there’s no way to just run our app forever, and sync in the background, unfortunately. Both Android and iOS allow us to fire an ‘event’ every 15 minutes, which we use to wake up the wallet and sync it. On Android, this event seems to be able to last as long as we like, so we run the sync for 14 minutes, then go back to sleep to wait for the next event. On iOS however, this event can only run for 30 seconds, which is obviously not very long. I don’t know if there’s any way around this, I couldn’t find any when I was searching. iOS also schedules the events with a proprietry algorithm – so they may end up never running, or just running once a day. This is going to probably be the biggest pain point to get around when porting to iOS.

RockSteady: As with most TRTL projects, we want to reach out to the community to help with things and give folks a chance to put their mark on the app, what are some “good first issues” for someone wanting to get started contributing to TonChan? Are there any features you’d like to see that you’re looking for collaborators on? What toolchain stuffs and helpful bits would someone need to follow in your foot steps and tinker around?

Zpalm: There are a couple of ‘Good first issues’ listed on the Github – https://github.com/turtlecoin/turtlecoin-mobile-wallet/issues – but frankly most of the things there aren’t too tricky to add. One not listed there but that would be very helpful is improving the setup guide. It’s kinda confusing to get the android studio setup done correctly, and an emulator running, which as you mention, would be needed to test things. I don’t think there are any huge features which we’d need collaboration on yet, aside from iOS support. If you’re wanting to implement something and are having issues, give me a ping and I’ll be happy to help you through them

RockSteady: What has it been like developing with React Native? For any developers out there considering it over something more conventional , what advice or forewarning would you give? How does it contrast from web apps written in React?

Zpalm: It certainly makes writing the UI nice. The react model of state always traveling down can be a little tricky to get used to, but once you’ve got the hang of it then it can be pretty fast to develop in. You can also use the majority of nodejs modules, however, you are likely to need a project like https://github.com/tradle/rn-nodeify/ to get them to work correctly, the setup is a little hacky. You will find some modules work perfectly in node, but a certain feature doesn’t work in react-native, which can be a little frustrating.

I would also advice against the react-navigation library – TonChan is using this to navigate between different screen, and it works OK, but some simple things, like going back to a specific screen are done in a very confusing way. I’ve heard good things about the wix library to replace this. If you need fine control over the Android OS, like running background/foreground services, then react-native is probably not for you. While you can write Java code and call it from react-native, it’s quite cumbersome and hard to integrate with the rest of your app. I would have liked to be able to launch a foreground service, but there’s currently no react-native modules which allow this, short of doing it yourself. Then, all your application code that runs in that service would have to be in Java, not JavaScript. Finally, all react-native code runs on a single thread, as that’s how JavaScript works. If you have high performance code, this may block the UI from rendering. So, pros include cross platform support, fast development, lots of libraries available, cons include somewhat hacky setup, single threaded execution, and not as fine grained integration with the OS.

RockSteady: Would you ever consider pure Java or Kotlin in the future?

Zpalm: Kotlin, maybe. I’ve written very little Java, but the small experience I had with it was poor, simple things were very verbose, and it looked no fun at all to develop in.

RockSteady: What was the process like boarding a crypto wallet app in the Google Play store? I know it’s been a bit of an uphill battle for people to get their wallet apps in the iOS app store. Can you walk us through the process of how you went from “now I have an app” to “now i have an app on the app store” and what all it entails being an “android developer”Also, please detail the costs and wait times involved.

Zpalm: It was really easy, to be honest. I just had to sign up for an account, send them $25, add some images to display in the store, and upload the apk. I think it was less than 24 hours from uploading my apk to it being live on the store.

Zpalm, thanks for the internet and thanks even more for the mobile wallet. It’s great seeing it grow as a project and I can’t wait to see who puts together the next great PR for it 😀

Categories
Weekly Update

This Week In TurtleCoin (Jan 1, 2019)

Happy new year! It’s been a great year with you all, and I hope you’ve all made the resolution to mine more TRTL this year, because we’ve got a heck of an update for you! Read more about the upcoming PoW upgrade! 30 days!

https://blog.turtlecoin.lol/archives/proof-of-work-algorithm-change/

Developer Updates

TurtlePay™ – I’m proud to say that the TurtlePay™ Public Beta launch occurred as promised just before Jan 1 2019 00:00:00 GMT. For those of you that have not been following the development of the project, there’s quite a bit of work going on behind the scene to make TurtlePay™ an awesome tool for developers. The service is FREE for everyone to use and the only fee is the standard network transaction fee of 0.10 TRTL.
TurtlePay™ is a payment processing service that is designed to help developers integrate TurtleCoin™ payments into their existing applications. By providing an easy to use set of tools to incorporate TurtleCoin™ payments into more applications, we hope to drive adoption of the technology to new heights.
Some people just want to write cool applications and develop new tools that allow them to use the technology without worrying about how it works, why it works, or keeping up with the latest and greatest features. Let us worry about the hard parts while you build awesome applications that use TurtleCoin™.
We’re looking forward to see what kind of cool things people start to build based on the platform. We’ve already identified a few tweaks to the current system that need to be made given some of the feedback a few people have provided.
In the next few weeks, I’ll be building out additional documentation on how to leverage the full power of TurtlePay™ and its related tools as well as adding additional features that will only make the platform better.
The platform is designed with scalability in mind and can easily grow as the needs of community grows. You can even run the platform yourself! Stay tuned for further updates! – IBurnMyCD

https://turtlepay.io

Mobile Wallet – A lot of people have been asking about a mobile wallet, so I thought I’d give it a shot. I’ve got a simple UI running on the phone, simply generating wallets and not much more yet.
I’m working on building out the main wallet functionality in a separate node package (https://github.com/zpalmtree/turtlecoin-wallet-backend) so it can be used for other things – think web wallets, native GUI wallets that don’t need any of the C++ code, etc. For that reason the repo will be pretty quiet until I’ve got that sorted out. Once the backend is done, it should just be a small matter of hooking it up and making everything look pretty, then off to the races.
This is going to be a native mobile wallet, so it’s not just a web wallet wrapped in an app. Furthermore, you’ll own your own private keys. This does mean you’ll have to scan the chain, which might be a bit heavy on CPU and battery life, but if you create a new wallet rather than importing, it shouldn’t be too bad. – Zpalm

https://github.com/zpalmtree/ton-chan

TurtleCoin RPC Nim – This is a Nim wrapper for the TurtleCoin RPC APIs. It includes two modules, `walletd` for wallet JSON RPC commands and `turtlecoind` for the daemon HTTP and JSON RPC methods. There is also a simple example on github showing how to use this package. I have been learning Nim for about a month so let me know if there are any bugs! – DSanon

https://github.com/anonanonymous/turtlecoin-rpc-nim

TurtleCoin-Utils – I’m happy to report that the TurtleCoin node.js utilities are almost complete. This package is designed to provide native JS (and TypeScript — Thanks Z!) methods and calls that work in Node and in browser to create addresses, decode addresses, scan transactions for funds, create new transactions, and even generate the ring signatures necessary to create a valid transaction on the network. I’ll be working on improving (and in some cases creating) the documentation for the package in the coming days to make the entire package easier to use. – IBurnMyCD

https://github.com/turtlecoin/turtlecoin-utils

Turtacus – Turtacus has been rapidly draining funds recently with very few donations coming in to support him. For that reason, I have begun looking at new ways for his prizes to be generated and funded. In coming time, I will be changing the way the tournament works. There will be an entry fee which will only allow those people who have entered, to make it onto the leaderboard. Anyone will be able to fight but only those entered will gain points for the tournament. On top of this, there will be a new points system for the tournament whereby winning will net you 2 points, losing will net you 1 point. In this way, participation is encouraged win or lose. The entry fee is yet to be decided but will likely be between 2500 and 5000 TRTL per person since this is an easy sum to acquire even just from tips during the week. The tournament prize will be 90% of the overall entry fees collected, with the other 10 % going to Turtacus’s prize fund which will be added to an occasional tournament prize pot. As you can tell, there are a lot of changes coming. It will take time but hopefully, it will encourage more fighters. – Rynem

https://www.github.com/rynemgar/gladiator-bot

New Turtle-Service API – To any developers who are currently developing apps with turtle – I would love if you would try out my new API  – It’s a replacement for turtle-service, and it gives a bit of a friendlier, REST based interface. If you are having trouble getting it working or have any queries, let me know and I’ll be happy to help. – zpalm

https://www.futuregadget.xyz/api-docs/

Promote Your Bounty

250,000 TRTL – Integrate popular hardware wallet from SatoshiLabs, Trezor T in TurtleCoin’s Nest wallet in order to create and encrypt, decrypt wallet and sign transactions with the device. – Elkim

teacup made this :D

Teacup made this 😀

Community Advertising

Tired of all that hard work in the turtle mines, and just want a little bit of TurtleCoin for free? C’mon over to the Llama & Horse TurtleCoin Faucet! https://trtl.faucet.llama.horse/ It runs a little differently from the other faucets, but we hope this leads to it being self-sustaining in the long-run.

https://trtl.faucet.llama.horse/

Come join us and help our ducks find turtles. We are a small TurtleCoin mining pool looking to grow. Low fee and friendly discord channel (link on site)

https://trtl.muxdux.com/

Shoutouts & Thanks

Massive shoutout to MadHatter for building the Nibblebot! You can now send & receive NBX as tips in the NibbleClassic server! – Sups

HAPPY NEW YEAR TURTLES!!! – Turtley McTurtleton

Thanks everyone for a wondrous year! You are all amazing! Here’s to next year! – Oiboo

Shout out to the whole community on such a great year and for helping each other out no matter the problem! Can’t wait to see what 2019 brings. – Khem Boi

2019 will be big for TurtleCoin – mkid

Happy 2019 @ everybody – if(true)

Thanks for the last year, its been a blast! Looking forward to next year! Great community and group! – japakar

Thanks to all turtles fot a year full of inspiration and fun(bearbeitet) – bernd

happy new year turtlecoin and lads <3 – mufalo

Thanks Rynem for creating Colosseum! Thanks community for the donations to it and the work he put into it! – Rynem

shoutout to the whole TurtleCoin community for a great first year, and ending of 2018. you’re a fun group of people, and our developers keep working hard. thanks for making it real, gang. – greywolf

Z, you’re just plain awesome. I appreciate the banter you provide and look forward to a mobile wallet soon™. – ibmcd

Dear Dominos, we’re through. – Rock

Thanks to @ibmcd and all the turtlecoin community to have patience and keep teaching me new programming stuff every time I come – mrrovot

Shoutout to CapEtn for helping to test lots of my code. It’s great to have people using my code before it goes live so we can fix all the bugs! – zpalm

To any developers who are currently developing apps with turtle – I would love if you would try out my new API (https://www.futuregadget.xyz/api-docs/) – It’s a replacement for turtle-service, and it gives a bit of a friendlier, REST based interface. If you are having trouble getting it working or have any queries, let me know and I’ll be happy to help. – zpalm